Pattha, Paṭṭha: 5 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Pattha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

pattha : (m.) a measure of grain or liquid, four of which make a seer. See pasata.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

1) Pattha, 2 (cp. late Sk. prastha) a Prastha (certain measure of capacity)=1/4 of an Āḷhaka; a cooking utensil containing one Prastha DhA. II, 154; SnA 476 (cattāro patthā āḷhakaṃ). (Page 407)

2) Pattha, 1 (fr. pa+ sthā. Cp. Epic Sk. prastha plateau) a lonely place, in cpd. vana° D. I, 71; Pug. 59 etc., a wilderness in the forest, explained by Bdhgh as “gāmantaṃ atikkamitvā manussānaṃ anupacāra-ṭṭhānaṃ yattha na kasanti na vapanti” DA. I, 210; Ud. 43 (patthañ ca sayan’āsanaṃ, ed.; but better with id. p. Dh. 185 as pantañ, which is explained at DhA. III, 238 by “vivittaṃ, ” i, e. separately). Cp. with this Sk. vana-prastha a forest situated on elevated land. (Page 407)

— or —

Paṭṭha, (adj.) (fr. pa+ sthā, see patthahati) “standing out, ” setting out or forth, undertaking, able (clever?) Vin. III, 210 (dhammiṃ kathaṃ kātuṃ); IV, 60 (cīvarakammaṃ kātuṃ), 254 (dhammiṃ kathaṃ kātuṃ) 285, 290; Nd2 p. 46 (for Sn. prose part puṭṭha; v. l. seṭṭha); Nd2 no. 388 (in explanation of paṭṭhagū Sn. 1095; here it clearly means “being near, attending on, a pupil or follower of”). See also paddha1 and paddhagu. (Page 402)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[Sanskrit to German]

Pattha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Paṭṭhā (पट्ठा):—(nm) a robust young man; young one, offspring; nerve sinew; wrestling apprentice/pupil.

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Paṭṭha (पट्ठ) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Praṣṭa.

2) Paṭṭha (पट्ठ) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Spṛṣṭa.

3) Paṭṭha (पट्ठ) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Pṛṣṭha.

4) Paṭṭha (पट्ठ) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Pṛṣṭha.

5) Pattha (पत्थ) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Prārtha.

6) Pattha (पत्थ) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Pārtha.

7) Pattha (पत्थ) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Prārtha.

8) Pattha (पत्थ) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Prastha.

9) Patthā (पत्था) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Prasthā.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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