Patakahasta, Patākahasta, Pataka-hasta: 1 definition

Introduction

Introduction:

Patakahasta means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Shodhganga: Vaisnava Agamas And Visnu Images

Patākahasta (पताकहस्त) is another name for Abhayahasta (the “hand-gesture of fearlessness”), representing one of the various hand-poses (hastas or mudrās) defined in treatises such as the Pāñcarātra, Pādmasaṃhitā and Vaikhānasa-āgamas, extensively dealing with the technical features of temple art, iconography and architecture in Vaishnavism.—Abhayahasta conveys fearlessness and benign concept. This symbolizes the assurance of fearlessness, tranquillity and protection given by the deity to his worshipper. This hand pose is very common in the icons of Indian deities. The right hand, displayed palm outward with the fingers raised, remains turned towards the onlooker. Tills is mainly on the lower right hand. Abhayahasta is also referred to as Patākahasta.

Patākahasta is almost same as abhaya-mudrā but the hand kept away horizontally. Walker describes “the open palm upright, usually facing the spectator, fingers close together and pointing upward, thumb slightly bent inwards to touch the lower side of the forefinger”. (Accn. No .449/60 and 500/65). In some of the icons of the Museum, this hand is found treated as abhaya-mudrā and the lotus tern with small bud is inserted (Accn. No.3).

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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