Pataha, aka: Paṭaha; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Pataha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana

[Pataha in Purana glossaries]

Paṭaha (पटह): a Musical Instrument.—It is not mentioned in the Vedas nor in the Jātakas. It is, however, mentioned in the epics. The Vāyu-purāṇa mentions it in the same manner as the Bherī.

(Source): Google Books: Cultural History from the Vāyu Purāna

Paṭaha (पटह) refers to a “musical instruments” (a sort of drum) that existed in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) as mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa.—The Nīlamata says that the land of Kaśmīra was thronged with ever-sportive and joyful people enjoying continuous festivities. Living amidst scenes of sylvan beauty they played, danced and sang to express their joys, to mitigate their pains, to please their gods and to appease their demons.

The Nīlamata refers to Paṭaha twice in association with lute. Probably the drum was played upon generally in accompaniment to the lute.

(Source): archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study

Paṭaha (पटह).—A war musical instrument.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 137. 29; 138. 3.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

[Pataha in Natyashastra glossaries]

Paṭaha (पटह) refers to a musical instrument, first mentioned in Nāṭyaśāstra 4.253, after Śiva danced using Recakas and Aṅgahāras, and Pārvatī performed a ‘gentle dance’.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[Pataha in Pali glossaries]

paṭaha : (m.) a kettle-drum; a wardrum.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Paṭaha, (cp. Epic Sk. paṭaha, dial. ) a kettle-drum, war drum, one of the 2 kinds of drums (bheri) mentioned at DhsA. 319, viz. mahā-bheri & p. -bheri; J. I, 355; Dpvs 16, 14; PvA. 4. (Page 391)

(Source): Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of pataha in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Pataha in Sanskrit glossaries]

Paṭaha (पटह).—

1) A kettle-drum, a war-drum, drum, tabor; कुर्वन् संध्याबलिपटहतां शूलिनः श्लाघनीयाम् (kurvan saṃdhyābalipaṭahatāṃ śūlinaḥ ślāghanīyām) Me.36; पटुपटह- ध्वनिभिर्विनीतनिद्रः (paṭupaṭaha- dhvanibhirvinītanidraḥ) R.9.71.

2) Beginning, undertaking.

3) Injuring, killing.

Derivable forms: paṭahaḥ (पटहः).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 13 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Pratipattipataha
Pratipattipaṭaha (प्रतिपत्तिपटह).—a kind of kettle drum. Derivable forms: pratipattipaṭahaḥ (प्...
Patahabhramana
Paṭahabhramaṇa (पटहभ्रमण).—going about with a drum to call people together. Derivable forms: pa...
Samgramapataha
Saṃgrāmapaṭaha (संग्रामपटह).—a large military drum. Derivable forms: saṃgrāmapaṭahaḥ (संग्रामपट...
Patahavela
Paṭahavelā (पटहवेला).—the hour at which a drum is beaten every day.Paṭahavelā is a Sanskrit com...
Vadhyapataha
Vadhyapaṭaha (वध्यपटह).—a drum beaten at the time of execution. Derivable forms: vadhyapaṭahaḥ ...
Nandipataha
Nandipaṭaha (नन्दिपटह).—(see tūryam above); छत्रं सव्यजनं सनन्दिपटहं भद्रासनं कल्पितम् (chatraṃ...
Bheri
Bherī (भेरी) refers to one of the ten kinds of sounds (śabda) according to the Matsyendrasaṃhit...
Pushkara
Puṣkara (पुष्कर) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as...
Panava
Paṇava (पणव).—A kind of musical instrument, a small drum or tabor; Bg.1.13; Śi.13.5; गुरु-पणव-व...
Durmada
1) Durmada (दुर्मद).—See Durdharṣaṇa. (See full article at Story of Durmada from the Puranic e...
Pahata
Pāhāta (पाहात).—The Indian mulberry.Derivable forms: pāhātaḥ (पाहातः).
Dendima
Deṇḍima, (m. nt.) (Sk. diṇḍima, cp. dindima) a kind of kettle-drum D.I, 79 (v. l. dindima); Nd...
Vajjha
Vajjha, (adj.) (grd. of vadhati) to be killed, slaughtered or executed; object of execution; ...

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