Pataha, Paṭaha: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Pataha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Google Books: Cultural History from the Vāyu Purāna

Paṭaha (पटह): a Musical Instrument.—It is not mentioned in the Vedas nor in the Jātakas. It is, however, mentioned in the epics. The Vāyu-purāṇa mentions it in the same manner as the Bherī.

Source: archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study

Paṭaha (पटह) refers to a “musical instruments” (a sort of drum) that existed in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) as mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa.—The Nīlamata says that the land of Kaśmīra was thronged with ever-sportive and joyful people enjoying continuous festivities. Living amidst scenes of sylvan beauty they played, danced and sang to express their joys, to mitigate their pains, to please their gods and to appease their demons.

The Nīlamata refers to Paṭaha twice in association with lute. Probably the drum was played upon generally in accompaniment to the lute.

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Paṭaha (पटह) refers to a kind of drum (musical instrument), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.22. Accordingly as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] On the top of the mountain near the city of Himālaya, Śiva sported about for a long time in the company of Satī. [...] The celestial damsels played on their lutes, tabours and drums (paṭaha) and danced with enthusiasm”.

Paṭaha is mentioned among the battle-drums in Śivapurāṇa 2.2.36. Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“on hearing these words of Dakṣa. the gods including Indra set off immediately in their readiness to fight. [...] Conchs were blown. Drums were beaten in that great war festival. Battle drums were sounded both big and small [viz., paṭaha]. Being encouraged by that sound, the Devas in the company of the guardians of the quarters hit and thrashed the attendants of Śiva”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Paṭaha (पटह).—A war musical instrument.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 137. 29; 138. 3.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Paṭaha (पटह) refers to a musical instrument, first mentioned in Nāṭyaśāstra 4.253, after Śiva danced using Recakas and Aṅgahāras, and Pārvatī performed a ‘gentle dance’.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Kavya (poetry)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (kavya)

Paṭaha (पटह) refers to “drums”, according to Bāṇa’s Kādambarī (p. 225-226).—Accordingly, while describing the shire of the Goddess Caṇḍikā, “[Then follows the image of the Goddess Caṇḍikā, which matches the conception of Kālarātri in the passage from the Mahābhārata:] [...] she was adorned in garlands of bilva-leaves furnished with gleaming fruits and buds anointed with red sandalwood, that were like hanging garlands of infant-heads; she expressed cruelty with limbs worshipped with clusters of kadamba flowers ruddy with blood, which horripilated, it seemed, at the thrill of the flavour of the keen roar of drums (paṭaha-paṭuraṭita-rasa) during the animal-offering; [...]”.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

paṭaha : (m.) a kettle-drum; a wardrum.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Paṭaha, (cp. Epic Sk. paṭaha, dial. ) a kettle-drum, war drum, one of the 2 kinds of drums (bheri) mentioned at DhsA. 319, viz. mahā-bheri & p. -bheri; J. I, 355; Dpvs 16, 14; PvA. 4. (Page 391)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Paṭaha (पटह).—

1) A kettle-drum, a war-drum, drum, tabor; कुर्वन् संध्याबलिपटहतां शूलिनः श्लाघनीयाम् (kurvan saṃdhyābalipaṭahatāṃ śūlinaḥ ślāghanīyām) Me.36; पटुपटह- ध्वनिभिर्विनीतनिद्रः (paṭupaṭaha- dhvanibhirvinītanidraḥ) R.9.71.

2) Beginning, undertaking.

3) Injuring, killing.

Derivable forms: paṭahaḥ (पटहः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Paṭaha (पटह).—mfn.

(-haḥ-hā-haṃ) A kettle-drum. m.

(-haḥ) 1. A war-drum, or one used in battle. 2. Injury, killing, slaughter. 4. Tumult. E. paṭa imitative sound, to quit or make, aff. ḍa .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Paṭaha (पटह).—[paṭa-ha] (vb. han), m. (and n.). A drum, a kettle-drum, [Pañcatantra] 261, 13.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Paṭaha (पटह).—[masculine] ([feminine] ī & [neuter]) kettle-drum, [abstract] [feminine]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Paṭaha (पटह):—m. (rarely n. or f(ī). ) a kettledrum, a war-drum, drum, tabor ([accusative] with √, or [Causal] of √ or √bhram, to proclaim anything by the sound of a drum), [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) m. beginning, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) hurting, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Paṭaha (पटह):—[paṭa-ha] (haḥ-hā-haṃ) 1. m. f. n. A kettledrum. m. A war-drum; slaughter.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Paṭaha (पटह) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Paḍaha.

[Sanskrit to German]

Pataha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Paṭaha (ಪಟಹ):—[noun] a kind of large drum as kettle-drum, war-drum, etc.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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