Pashupatayoga, Pāśupatayoga, Pashupata-yoga: 4 definitions

Introduction:

Pashupatayoga means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Pāśupatayoga can be transliterated into English as Pasupatayoga or Pashupatayoga, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Pashupatayoga in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Pāśupatayoga (पाशुपतयोग).—The earliest form of yoga established; even Gods like Indra practised this and got wealth constituting aṇimā, mahimā, laghimā, prāpti, garimā, prākānujam, īśitvam, vāśitva, and amaratva;1 one who practises it at Benares is rid of the cycle of births and deaths.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 27. 116, 128; Vāyu-purāṇa 1. 195.
  • 2) Matsya-purāṇa 182. 12.
Source: Shodhganga: The saurapurana - a critical study

Pāśupatayoga (पाशुपतयोग) refers to the “system of Yoga” followed by the Pāśupatas (Śiva-worshippers).—The system of Yoga followed by these Śiva-worshippers is called Pāśupatayoga, their vrata is called Pāśupatavrata and the knowledge of Śiva is called Pāśupatajñāna.

Pāśupatayoga was taught by sage Śvetāśvatara  to king Suśīla, according to the 10th century Saurapurāṇa: one of the various Upapurāṇas depicting Śaivism.—Accordingly, [...] “On the bank of the Ganges king Suśīla saw a great sage, Śvetāśvatara by name who was a great Pāśupata, free from passions and wearing kaupīna (tattered garment). He besmeared ashes (bhasma) all over his body and had the tripuṇḍra mark on his forehead. The king with folded hands prayed the ascetic to accept him as a disciple and the latter admitted him into the Pāśupata order and taught him Pāśupata Yoga. Thus Suśīla became a Pāśupata, did svādhyāya, became free from passions, besmeared his body with ashes and having controlled his senses he finally got liberation”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of pashupatayoga or pasupatayoga in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Pashupatayoga in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pāśupatayoga (पाशुपतयोग).—The system of पाशुपत (pāśupata). See पाशुपतम् (pāśupatam).

Derivable forms: pāśupatayogaḥ (पाशुपतयोगः).

Pāśupatayoga is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms pāśupata and yoga (योग). See also (synonyms): pāśupatavrata.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pāśupatayoga (पाशुपतयोग):—[=pāśupata-yoga] [from pāśupata > pāśava] m. the system of the p°, [Sarvadarśana-saṃgraha]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of pashupatayoga or pasupatayoga in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

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