Pashupata, aka: Pāśupata, Pāśupatā; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Pashupata means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Pāśupata and Pāśupatā can be transliterated into English as Pasupata or Pashupata, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purāṇa

1a) Pāśupata (पाशुपत).—The astra of Śiva.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 31. 39; 32. 57; 34. 34; 40. 65. IV. 29. 140.

1b) A tīrtha on the Pārvatīkā, sacred to Pitṛs.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 22. 56.

2) Pāśupatā (पाशुपता).—Followers of the Pāśupata yogam.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 32. 5.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purāṇa book cover
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The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Dhanurveda (science of warfare)

Pāśupata (पाशुपत) refers to a weapon (a celebrated weapon given by Śiva to Arjuna). It is a Sanskrit word defined in the Dhanurveda-saṃhitā, which contains a list of no less than 117 weapons. The Dhanurveda-saṃhitā is said to have been composed by the sage Vasiṣṭha, who in turn transmitted it trough a tradition of sages, which can eventually be traced to Śiva and Brahmā.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Dhanurveda
Dhanurveda book cover
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Dhanurveda (धनुर्वेद) refers to the “knowledge of warfare” and, as an upaveda, is associated with the Ṛgveda. It contains instructions on warfare, archery and ancient Indian martial arts, dating back to the 2nd-3rd millennium BCE.

Discover the meaning of pashupata or pasupata in the context of Dhanurveda from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Pāśupata (पाशुपत) refers to one of the four ancient Śaiva schools according to Śaṅkarācārya’s work.—The Pāśupata was the oldest form of Śaivism prevalent in North India. The Mahābhārata says that the Pāśupata doctrines were first preached by Śiva Śrīkaṇta who was probably a human teacher. Lakulīśa was probably his disciple. References to Lakulīśa, the great exponent of the Pāśupata sect, are found in an inscription dated C.E. 380-81, belonging to the reign of Chandragupta II from which it appears that he flourished in 4th century C.E in the Kathiawar region.

One of the important streams of the ancient Pāśupata system later culminated in what may be called Āgamānta Śaivism. The Āgamānta Śaivas appear to have contributed to the development of Tāntric ideas in Tamiḻ Śaivism. Rājēndra Cōḻā, during his expeditions in northern India, came in touch with some teachers of this school and brought them to his own country.

(Source): DSpace at Pondicherry: Siddha Cult in Tamilnadu (shaivism)
Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

pāśupata (पाशुपत).—m S A worshiper of Shiva in his capacity of paśupati.

--- OR ---

pāśupata (पाशुपत).—a S Relating to Shiva--a vrata-dīkṣā-mata- mantra-astra &c.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pāśupata (पाशुपत).—a. (- f.) [पशुपतेरिदम् अण् (paśupateridam aṇ)] Coming from or relating or sacred to Paśupati.

-taḥ 1 A follower and worshipper of Śiva.

2) A follower of the doctrines of Paśupati.

-tam The Pāśupata doctrines; (for the Pāśupata doctrines, see Sarva. S.); मया पाशुपतं दक्ष शुभमुत्पादितं पुरा (mayā pāśupataṃ dakṣa śubhamutpāditaṃ purā) Mb.12.284.195; (com. 'agniriti bhasma°' ityādinā bhasma gṛhītvā nimṛjyāṅgāni saṃspṛśet | tasmād vratametat pāśupatam |)

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Relevant definitions

Search found 31 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

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