Pashupa, aka: Paśupa, Pashu-pa; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Pashupa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Paśupa can be transliterated into English as Pasupa or Pashupa, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Itihasa (narrative history)

Pashupa in Itihasa glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Paśupa (पशुप) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.48.3) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Paśupa) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
context information

Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Paśupa (पशुप).—a herdsman.

Derivable forms: paśupaḥ (पशुपः).

Paśupa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms paśu and pa (प).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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