Parvatagra, Parvatāgra, Parvata-agra: 7 definitions

Introduction:

Parvatagra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Parvatagra in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Parvatāgra (पर्वताग्र) refers to the “summit of a mountain”, according to Śivapurāṇa 1.15. Accordingly, regarding the benefit in the rites of Devayajña:—“[...] the bank of a holy tank, the bank of an ordinary river, the bank of a holy river and the banks of the seven holy Gaṅgās are each of ten times more benefit than the previous [...] The shores of the sea are of ten times more benefit than the previous. The summit of a mountain (parvatāgra) is of ten times more benefit than the shores of the sea”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Parvatagra in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Parvatāgra (पर्वताग्र) refers to a “mountain peak”, according to the Jayadrathayāmala verse 2.19.27-29.—Accordingly, “Having gone to a place where there are no people, a mountain peak [i.e., parvatāgra], the bank of a river, a frightening cremation ground, a beautiful deserted forest or a secluded part of the house at night or wherever (else) one pleases, or having reached (that) great place which is a sacred seat of Yoginīs and levelled the ground, extract the Vidyā”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Parvatagra in Shaivism glossary
Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Parvatāgra (पर्वताग्र) refers to “mountains”, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 13.25cd-28, while describing the appearance and worship of Viśvakarman]—“Furthermore, [I shall describe] Viśvakarman, the Lord of the world. [...] [The Mantrin] must honor [him] by praising (stūyamāna) Devas, Siddhas, and Gandharvas. [The Mantrin can choose to] worship [him] in a heap of [ritual] fire, or in water, or at mountains (parvatāgrasthale'nale jale caiva parvatāgre prapūjayet). In whatever place he thinks [of Viśvakarman], [the deity] grants the fruits of desire”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Parvatagra in Ayurveda glossary

Toxicology (Study and Treatment of poison)

Source: Shodhganga: Kasyapa Samhita—Text on Visha Chikitsa

Parvatāgra (पर्वताग्र) refers to a “mountain top”, and is mentioned in a list of places highly susceptible to snake-bites, as taught in the Kāśyapa Saṃhitā: an ancient Sanskrit text from the Pāñcarātra tradition dealing with both Tantra and Viṣacikitsā—an important topic from Āyurveda which deals with the study of Toxicology (Agadatantra or Sarpavidyā).—The Kāśyapasaṃhitā mentions that snake-bites that happen in certain places [like a mountain top (parvatāgra)] are highly inimical to the victim.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Parvatagra in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Parvatāgra (पर्वताग्र).—[neuter] the same.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Parvatāgra (पर्वताग्र):—[from parvata > parv] n. m°-top, [Rāmāyaṇa]

[Sanskrit to German]

Parvatagra in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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