Parikshartha, Pariksha-artha, Parīkṣārtha: 4 definitions

Introduction:

Parikshartha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Parīkṣārtha can be transliterated into English as Pariksartha or Parikshartha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Parikshartha in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Parīkṣārtha (परीक्षार्थ) refers to “testing (the fruitfulness of one’s penance)”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.22 (“Description of Pārvatī’s penance”).—Accordingly, after Menā spoke to Pārvatī: “[...] Suppressing the delusion with fortitude after a long time Pārvatī, the daughter of Himavat, got herself initiated for the observance of ritualistic activities. She performed penance in the excellent holy centre Śṛṅgitīrtha which (later) acquired the title ‘Gaurī-Śikhara’ due to her performance of penance thereon. O sage, many beautiful holy plants were laid there by Pārvatī for testing the fruitfulness of her penance [i.e., parīkṣārtha]. [...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Sports, Arts and Entertainment (wordly enjoyments)

[«previous next»] — Parikshartha in Arts glossary
Source: archive.org: Syainika Sastra of Rudradeva with English Translation (art)

Parīkṣārtha (परीक्षार्थ) refers to the “procedure of testing one’s food”, according to the Śyainika-śāstra: a Sanskrit treatise dealing with the divisions and benefits of Hunting and Hawking, written by Rājā Rudradeva (or Candradeva) in possibly the 13th century.—Accordingly, [while discussing the conclision of hawking]: “[...] The food should be first given to horses and birds for testing it (parīkṣārtha). The food should be brought by experienced cooks and consist of roast meats and rice as white as the Kunda (jasmine) flower. He should eat along with his retinue. After chewing pan he should go back to his residence, conversing all the way on a variety of subjects, [...]”.

Arts book cover
context information

This section covers the skills and profiencies of the Kalas (“performing arts”) and Shastras (“sciences”) involving ancient Indian traditions of sports, games, arts, entertainment, love-making and other means of wordly enjoyments. Traditionally these topics were dealt with in Sanskrit treatises explaing the philosophy and the justification of enjoying the pleasures of the senses.

Discover the meaning of parikshartha or pariksartha in the context of Arts from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Parikshartha in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Parīkṣārtha (परीक्षार्थ):—[from parīkṣā > parīkṣ] mfn. wishing to try or test, [Āpastamba]

[Sanskrit to German]

Parikshartha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of parikshartha or pariksartha in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

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