Parameshvari, Parameśvarī: 6 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Parameshvari means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Parameśvarī can be transliterated into English as Paramesvari or Parameshvari, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Parmeswari.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Parameshvari in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Parameśvarī (परमेश्वरी).—The chief Śakti, Lalitā;1 enshrined in Pātāla.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 6. 65; 16. 1; 18. 15; 19. 60; 22. 5.
  • 2) Matsya-purāṇa 13. 39.
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Parameshvari in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Parameśvarī (परमेश्वरी) is the name of a deity, according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “Ucchuṣma is in the central aperture. At the left [peak] the Nīlahrada should be, and the Hrada [= Mahāhrada] at the right peak.... This pair of apertures, O Devī, is known as the peak of Trikūṭa. The third one is the (brahmarandhra), which is called the Forest of Ucchuṣma. From [this] Ucchuṣma a [twofold] stream comes forth, right and left. Where [this twofold stream] comes together, O Varārohā, there abides Parameśvarī. Because she can see [there every form] at will, that [place] is known as Kāmarūpa”.

2) Parameśvarī (परमेश्वरी) refers to the “Supreme Power who is the one Supreme Goddess”, according to the Nityāṣoḍaśikārṇava (also called Vāmakeśvarīmata), the root Tantra of Tripurā inspired by Trika doctrine and reinforced by the teachings of the Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “Tripurā, the Supreme Power is the first-born here (in this world)... Once she has assimilated all the seed letters (into herself), Vāmā abides (in the form of) a sprout. Then Jyeṣṭhā (assumes the form) of (a straight line which is like a) flame (śikhā). O Supreme Goddess, (when) she assumes the (triangular) form of a water chestnut, (she is) Raudrī, whose nature is to devour the universe. She is that Supreme Power who is the one Supreme Goddess (Parameśvarī), the threefold Goddess Tripurā who is Brahmā, Viṣṇu and Īśa. O beloved, she is the power of will, knowledge and action. She emanates the Triple World and so she is called Tripurā”.

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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Parameśvarī.—(EI 6), title of a queen, especially a ruling queen. Note: parameśvarī is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Parameshvari in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Parameśvarī (परमेश्वरी):—[from parameśvara > parama > para] f. Name of Durgā, [Harivaṃśa]

2) [v.s. ...] of Sītā, [Rāmatāpanīya-upaniṣad] ( Name of [work])

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Parameshvari in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Parameśvarī (परमेश्वरी) [Also spelled parmeswari]:—(nf) see [durgā]; a shrew, quarrelsome woman.

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