Paraloka, Para-loka: 21 definitions

Introduction:

Paraloka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Parlok.

Images (photo gallery)

In Hinduism

Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Brhad Bhagavatamrtam

Paraloka (परलोक) refers to:—The transcendental world. (cf. Glossary page from Śrī Bṛhad-bhāgavatāmṛta).

Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

Discover the meaning of paraloka in the context of Vaishnavism from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (philosophy)

Paraloka (परलोक) refers to an “afterlife”, according to the Nyāyamañjarī, vol. I, 326.—Accordingly, “[...] Among these [two types of inference,] who would not admit the validity of an inference such as that [of fire] from smoke? So [people] apprehend what is to be established [by such an inference] even though they are not pestered by logicians. But the validity of an inference regarding such [entities] as the Self, God, an omniscient or an afterlife (paraloka) is not acknowledged by those who know reality”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of paraloka in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Paraloka (परलोक) refers to the “future life”, according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter 22, v2).—Accordingly, “The Bodhisattva takes birth into a Kṣatriya family or a Brāhmaṇa family.—Brāhmaṇa families have wisdom; Kṣatriya families have power. The Brāhmaṇa favors the future life (paraloka); the Kṣatriya favors the present life (ihaloka): both families are useful in the world; this is why the Bodhisattva is born among them. There is also the worthy family of the Dharma (dharma-kula), that of the non-regressing adepts (avaivartika). Taking birth in these families is the excellence of the family”.

Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Paraloka (परलोक) refers to the “next world”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly, “Son of good family, there are eight purities of meditation (dhyāna) of the Bodhisattvas, which are like the expanse of the sky. What are these eight? To wit, (1) while meditating, he does not meditate abiding in the parts of personality; (2) while meditating, he does not meditate abiding in realms of perception; (3) while meditating, he does not meditate abiding in fields of the senses; (4) while meditating, one he not meditate abiding in this world; (5) while meditating, he does not meditate abiding in the next world (paraloka); (6) while meditating, he does not meditate abiding in the world of desire; (7) while meditating, he does not meditate abiding in the world of form; (8) while meditating, he does not meditate abiding in the world without form; Son of good family, those eight are the pure meditations of the Bodhisattvas”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

Discover the meaning of paraloka in the context of Mahayana from relevant books on Exotic India

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Jaina Yoga

Paraloka (परलोक) or Paralokabhaya refers to “fear of the next world” and represents one of the seven types of fear (bhaya), according to Cāmuṇḍarāya in his Caritrasāra. Accordingly, these seven bhayas are referred to by Cāmuṇḍarāya in connexion with niḥśaṅka, or “freedom from fear”, which represents an aspect of samyaktva (right belief) classified under the liṅga heading.

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Paraloka (परलोक) refers to the “other world”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “It goes along with [sentient beings to the other world] [com.—in the other world, etc. (paralokādau)], then it protects, produces benefit always [and], having saved [them] from the mire of life it sets [them] on the pure path [of liberation]. There is nothing like the doctrine which is productive of all prosperity, the root of the tree of bliss, beneficial, venerable and grants liberation”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of paraloka in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Paraloka in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

paraloka : (m.) the world beyond.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Paraloka refers to: (cpd. either with para 1. or para 2. It is hardly justified to assume a metaphysical sense, or to take para as temporal in the sense of paraṃ (cp. paraṃmaraṇā after death), i.e. the future world or the world to come) the other world, the world beyond (opp. ayaṃ loko this world or idhaloka the world here, see on term Stede, Peta Vatthu p. 29 sq.) D. I, 27, 58, 187; II, 319; S. I, 72, 138; Sn. 579, 666, 1117; Nd1 60; Nd2 214 (v. l. for paloka in anicca-passage) 410 (=manussalokaṃ ṭhapetvā sabbo paraloko); Ps. I, 121; Vv 845 (=narakaṃ hi sattānaṃ ekantânatthatāya parabhūto paṭisattubhūto loko ti visesato paraloko ti VvA. 335); PvA. 5, 60 (=pettivisaya parattha), 64Q, 107, 253 (idhalokato p. natthi); SnA 478 (=parattha); Sdhp. 316, 326, 327.

Note: paraloka is a Pali compound consisting of the words para and loka.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of paraloka in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

paralōka (परलोक).—m (S) The other world; the state after death. 2 A comprehensive term for all the places of bliss and wo feigned by the Hindus.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

paralōka (परलोक).—m The other world.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of paraloka in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Paraloka (परलोक).—the next (or furture) world; परलोकनवप्रवासिनः प्रतिपत्स्ये पदवीमहं तव (paralokanavapravāsinaḥ pratipatsye padavīmahaṃ tava) Ku. 4.1. °गमः, °यानम् (gamaḥ, °yānam) death. °विधि (vidhi) funeral rites; परलोक- विधौ च माधव स्मरमुद्दिश्य (paraloka- vidhau ca mādhava smaramuddiśya) (nibapeḥ sahakāramañjarīḥ) Kumārasambhava 4.38.

Derivable forms: paralokaḥ (परलोकः).

Paraloka is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms para and loka (लोक).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Pāraloka (पारलोक).—(?) (m., = AMg. pāraloga, according to [Ardha-Māgadhī Dictionary]; Sanskrit paraloka), the other world: imaṃ lokaṃ °kaṃ (acc.) Mahāvastu i.9.2 (verse; v.l. pala°; first part of śloka). Senart quotes Aśokan pālaloka, but the passage he cites (Dhauli Sep. II.6; Jaugada Sep. II.7) is now read pala° (Hultzsch 98, 115); compare however pālate, °taṃ (according to Hultzsch 119 n. 3 to Sanskrit adv. paratra; rather *para-tva ?).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Paraloka (परलोक).—m.

(-kaḥ) Heaven, paradise. E. para another, and loka world.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Paraloka (परलोक).—m. heaven, paradise, [Pañcatantra] 207, 21.

Paraloka is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms para and loka (लोक).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Paraloka (परलोक).—[masculine] the other or future world.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Paraloka (परलोक):—[=para-loka] [from para] m. the other or future world, [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa; Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Paraloka (परलोक):—[para-loka] (kaṃ) 1. n. Another world.

[Sanskrit to German]

Paraloka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of paraloka in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Paraloka in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Paraloka (परलोक) [Also spelled parlok]:—(nm) the other world, after world, next world; heavenly paradise; ~[gamana] death, dying, going to the next world; demise; ~[vāsī] late; dead; —[kī ciṃtā karanā] to care for the other world, to do something to brighten one’s otherworldly prospects; —[bananā/sudharanā] the way to the next world to be paved (by good deeds); —[bananā/sudhāranā] to ensure a good deal in post-mortem existence; —[bigāḍanā] to spoil one’s other-worldly prospects; —[sidhāranā] to leave for one’s heavenly abode, to expire.

context information

...

Discover the meaning of paraloka in the context of Hindi from relevant books on Exotic India

Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Paralōka (ಪರಲೋಕ):—[noun] the world other than the one we live in, esp. heaven, supposed to be the abode of the virtuous people after their death.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

Discover the meaning of paraloka in the context of Kannada from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: