Paraka, Parakā, Parāka, Pāraka: 11 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Paraka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Parāka (पराक) (in parākiṇām) refers to a “religious vow involving a fast of twelve days”, and is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 17.193.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

parakā (परका) [or खा, khā].—a (parakīya S) Other, foreign, not among one's own;--used of persons: also strange, different, new;--used of things.

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pārakā (पारका).—a Commonly pārakhā. Other &c.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

parakā (परका).—or-khā Other, foreign, different, new.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Parāka (पराक).—a. Small.

-kaḥ 1 A sacrificial sword.

2) A kind of penance; यतात्मनोऽप्रमत्तस्य द्वादशाहमभोजनम् । पराको नाम कृच्छ्रोऽयं सर्वपापापनोदनः (yatātmano'pramattasya dvādaśāhamabhojanam | parāko nāma kṛcchro'yaṃ sarvapāpāpanodanaḥ) Ms.11.215; N.17.193. द्वादशाहोपवासेन पराकः परिकीर्तितः (dvādaśāhopavāsena parākaḥ parikīrtitaḥ); U.4.

3) A kind of disease.

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Pāraka (पारक).—a. (-) [पॄ-ण्वुल् (pṝ-ṇvul)]

1) Enabling to cross.

2) Carrying over, saving, delivering.

3) Pleasing, satisfying.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Parāka (पराक).—m.

(-kaḥ) 1. A religious obligation of an expiatory kind, fasting for twelve days and nights, and keeping the mind attentive, and organs subdued. 2. A sacrificial sword or scimitar. E. parā best, aka what goes.

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Pāraka (पारक).—mfn.

(-kaḥ-kā-kī-kaṃ) 1. What purifies, protects, cherishes, pleases, &c. 2. What enables one to cross, (a river or the world.) 3. Serving, delivering. E. pṝ to please, ṇvul aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Parāka (पराक).—i. e. parāñc + a, m. A sort of penance, fasting for twelve days and nights, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 11, 215.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Parāka (पराक).—[substantive] distance (only [locative] & [ablative]); [masculine] a kind of penance.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Paraka (परक):—[from para] ifc. = para, ‘the following sound or word’, e.g. iti-śabda-p, followed by the word iti, [Pāṇini [Scholiast or Commentator]]

2) Parāka (पराक):—[from parāñc] m. distance (only e and āt, at or from a d°), [Ṛg-veda] (cf. [Naighaṇṭuka, commented on by Yāska iii, 26])

3) [v.s. ...] Name of a Tri-rātra, [Brāhmaṇa; ???]

4) [v.s. ...] of a sort of religious penance (said to consist in fasting for 12 days and nights and keeping the mind attentive and organs subdued), [Manu-smṛti; Yājñavalkya]

5) [v.s. ...] a sacrificial sword, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] a kind of disease, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] a species of animal, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] mfn. small, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) Pāraka (पारक):—[from pāra] a mf(ī)n. carrying over, saving, delivering (cf. ugra-p)

10) [v.s. ...] enabling to cross (a river or the world), [Horace H. Wilson]

11) [v.s. ...] satisfying, pleasing, cherishing, [ib.]

12) [v.s. ...] m. [plural] Name of a People, R

13) b See under 1. pāra.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Parāka (पराक):—(kaḥ) 1. m. A penance of 12 days and nights; sacrificial knife.

2) Pāraka (पारक):—[(kaḥ-kā-kī-kaṃ) a.] Purifying; cherishing; conducting across.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Paraka (परक):—= para am Ende eines adj. comp.: itiśabdaparaka worauf das Wort iti folgt [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 1, 4, 62,] [Scholiast] ḍācparaka [Scholiast] zu [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 6, 1, 100. 4, 93.]

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Parāka (पराक):—

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Pāraka (पारक):—f. pārakī gaṇa gaurādi zu [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 4, 1, 41.]

1) nom. ag. (von 2. par) viell. hinüberführend, errettend im Nomen proprium udrapāraka . —

2) m. pl. Nomen proprium eines Volkes [Rāmāyaṇa 4, 40, 29.]

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Parāka (पराक):—

3) [Oxforder Handschriften 283,a,14.] [WEBER, Rāmatāpanīya Upaniṣad 356.]

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Pāraka (पारक):—vgl. bhikṣukī .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Paraka (परक):—am Ende eines adj. Comp. - para 2)a).

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Parāka (पराक):——

1) Ferne , Nur Loc. in der Ferne und Abl. aus d. F. , fern.

2) m. — a) ein best. Trirātra. — b) eine best. Kasteiung. — c) *Schwert. — d) *eine best. Krankheit. — e) *ein best. Thier.

3) *Adj. winzig.

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Pāraka (पारक):——

1) Adj. (*f. ī) hinüberführend , errettend in udra

2) m. Pl. Nomen proprium eines Volkes.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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