Pandaka, aka: Paṇḍaka; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Pandaka means something in Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

1. Pandaka

A monk, friend of Kapila, who lived in a village near Kosambi. He was found guilty of having taken what did not belong to him and also of unchastity. Vin.iii.67.

2. Pandaka

A Yakkha of the Himalaya region. He, his wife Harita, and his five hundred sons, became sotapannas when Majjhantika preached to Aravala. Mhv.xii.21.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Pandaka in Pali glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

paṇḍaka : (m.) an eunuch.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Paṇḍaka, (cp late (dial.) Sk. paṇḍa & paṇḍaka; for etym. see Walde, Lat. Wtb. under pello) a eunuch, weakling Vin. I, 86, 135, 168, 320; IV, 20, 269; A. III, 128; V, 71; Sdhp. 79.—With ref. to the female sex as paṇḍikā at Vin. II, 271 (itthi°). (Page 404)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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