Panava, Paṇava: 11 definitions

Introduction

Panava means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Google Books: Cultural History from the Vāyu Purāna

Paṇava (पणव): a Musical Instrument.—It is not found mentioned in the Ṛgveda and the paṇava-deṇḍima is mentioned in the Jātakas; and this Paṇava is probably the same as our Paṇava. The Rāmāyaṇa mentions its use in military bands, and the Mahābhārata confirms this. The Vāyu-purāṇa associates its use with the Kurus as above.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Paṇava (पणव).—A son of Bāhyaka.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 96. 4.

1b) A musical instrument.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 45. 40; Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 9. 15.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

1) Paṇava (पणव) is a Sanskrit word referring to a musical instrument (a small drum or tabor), to be sounded during the ceremony of “laying the foundation” of the playhouse (nāṭyamaṇḍapa), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra 2.35-37.

Paṇava refers to one of the major types of drums (puṣkara) according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 33. Accordingly, “The syllabic sounds such as k, kh, g, pṇ [ dh ] r v āṅ pr, h, nād brhulāṇ dhrā hu lām are to be used in playing a Paṇava. And kiri ghiṇṭām tho tho ṇo dho tr hulām kiri ghiṇṭām ṇo ṇo ṇā ṇṭām co ktri kiri kaṇḍā maṭā maṭa tthi te ṭe ṭe donnām is the music of Paṇava. The experts should produce in striking loosely and tightly Paṇava, the different karaṇas by means of the tip of the little and the ring fingers.”

According to verse 242-244.—“the paṇava should be made sixteen fingers long and its middle should be thin, and faces should be eight and five fingers in diametre. Its lips (i.e. rims) should be made half of a finger in thickness, and its middle should be hollow and four fingers in diametre”.

2) Paṇava (पणव) is another name for Kuvalayamālā, which refers to a type of syllabic metre (vṛtta), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 16. In this metre, the first, the eighth, the ninth and the tenth syllables of a foot (pāda) are heavy (guru), while the rest of the syllables are light (laghu). It is also known by the name Paṇava.

⎼⏑⏑¦⏑⏑⏑¦⏑⎼⎼¦⎼¦¦⎼⏑⏑¦⏑⏑⏑¦⏑⎼⎼¦⎼¦¦
⎼⏑⏑¦⏑⏑⏑¦⏑⎼⎼¦⎼¦¦⎼⏑⏑¦⏑⏑⏑¦⏑⎼⎼¦⎼¦¦

Paṇava falls in the Paṅkti class of chandas (rhythm-type), which implies that verses constructed with this metre have four pādas (‘foot’ or ‘quarter-verse’) containing ten syllables each.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

Paṇava (पणव) is the alternative name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) mentioned by Hemacandra (1088-1173 C.E.) in his auto-commentary on the second chapter of the Chandonuśāsana. Paṇava corresponds to Kuvalayamālā (according to Barata). Hemacandra gives these alternative names for the metres by other authorities (like Bharata), even though the number of gaṇas or letters do not differ.

Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Paṇava.—(EI 24), a musical instrument. Note: paṇava is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Paṇava, (cp. Ep. Sk. paṇava, dial; accord. to BR a corruption of praṇava) a small drum or cymbal D. I, 79; S. II, 128; IV, 344; A. II, 117, 241; J. III, 59 (of an executioner; PvA. 4 in id. p. has paṭaha); Th. 1, 467; Bu I. 32; Vv 8110; Dhs. 621 (°sadda); DhA. I, 18. (Page 403)

— or —

Paṇava, (cp. Ep. Sk. paṇava, dial; accord. to BR a corruption of praṇava) a small drum or cymbal D. I, 79; S. II, 128; IV, 344; A. II, 117, 241; J. III, 59 (of an executioner; PvA. 4 in id. p. has paṭaha); Th. 1, 467; Bu I. 32; Vv 8110; Dhs. 621 (°sadda); DhA. I, 18. (Page 403)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Paṇava (पणव).—A kind of musical instrument, a small drum or tabor; Bg.1.13; Śi.13.5; गुरु-पणव-वेणु-गुञ्जाभेरी (guru-paṇava-veṇu-guñjābherī)...... Bk.18.45.

Derivable forms: paṇavaḥ (पणवः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Paṇava (पणव).—mf.

(-vaḥ-vā) A sort of musical instrument; a small drum or tabor. E. paṇ business or price, to sound, aff. ka; it is also read praṇava.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Paṇava (पणव).—[masculine] a kind of drum.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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