Palala, Palāla, Pālala, Palālā: 21 definitions

Introduction:

Palala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Dietetics and Culinary Art (such as household cooking)

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Pālala (पालल) refers to a type of sweet food-preparation, according to the Aṣṭādhyāyi VI.2.128, and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—Pālala, saṃyāva and apūpa are the sweet preparations referred to in the aphorisms of Pāṇini.

Toxicology (Study and Treatment of poison)

Source: Shodhganga: Kasyapa Samhita—Text on Visha Chikitsa

Palala (पलल) refers to “meat” and is the name of an ingredient included in a (snake) poison antidote recipe, according to the Kāśyapa Saṃhitā: an ancient Sanskrit text from the Pāñcarātra tradition dealing with both Tantra and Viṣacikitsā—an important topic from Āyurveda which deals with the study of Toxicology (Viṣavidyā or Sarpavidyā).—Several formulations have been mentioned in the form of Pāna—drink or decoction (kaṣāya).—According to Kāśyapasaṃhitā (verse VIII.49), “A potion of sesame oil, meat (palala), jaggery, milk and Arka mixed in equal measures along with the powdered root of Alarka tree is also mentioned as a quick reliever of both kinds of poison”.

Agriculture (Krishi) and Vrikshayurveda (study of Plant life)

Source: Shodhganga: Drumavichitrikarnam—Plant mutagenesis in ancient India

Palāla (पलाल) refers to a “straw (rope)”, according to the Vṛkṣāyurveda by Sūrapāla (1000 CE): an encyclopedic work dealing with the study of trees and the principles of ancient Indian agriculture.—Accordingly, “If thick stems of Cucumis melo var. utilissiumus and Benincasa hispida plants are smeared with honey and melted butter then tied together with straw rope (palāla-rajju) [baddhā palālarajjvā ca] and then covered with cow dung they become one. Later, if the stem is cut keeping the order of the root and tip, Cucumis melo var. utilissiumus, bears fruits of Benincasa hispida size”.

Unclassified Ayurveda definitions

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Palala (पलल) is another name (synonym) for Tilakalka, a Sanskrit name referring to the paste made of the seeds of Sesamum indicum (sesame). This synonym was identified by Narahari in his 13th-century Rājanighaṇṭu (verses 16.111-116), which is an Ayurvedic medicinal thesaurus.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Palālā (पलाला).—One of the seven mothers of Subrahmaṇya. The other six are: Kākī, Halimā, Brahmikā, Mālinī, Āryā and Mitrā. (Śloka 10, Chapter 228, Vana Parva).

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Palāla (पलाल) refers to “rotten meat” [?], according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “Abandon (both) form (rūpa) and the formless [i.e., arūpa]. Practice what is beyond form. All this (divine body) is in the form of a container (of the supreme state). It is the radiant energy which is all things. One who desires the (supreme) good should abandon everything. It is as useless as rotten meat [i.e., palāla]. O god, there is nothing at all (of deity) in the navel, heart, mouth, and nose, nothing at all between the eyebrows, forehead, in the middle of the palate, or within the uvula, head and eyes. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

palāla : (nt.) straw.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Palāla, (m. & nt.) (cp. Ved. & Epic Sk. palāla) straw J. I, 488; DhA. I, 69.

—channaka a roof of thatch Th. 1, 208.—piṇḍa a bundle of straw Vism. 257=KhA 56.—pīṭhaka “straw foot-stool, ” a kind of punishment or torture M. I, 87= A. II, 122=Miln. 197 (see Miln. trsl. I. 277 “Straw Seat, ” i.e. being so beaten with clubs, that the bones are broken, and the body becomes like a heap of straw); Nd1 154; Nd2 604; J. V, 273.—puñja a heap of straw D. I, 71; M. III, 3; A. I, 241; II, 210; Pug. 68; VbhA. 367.—puñjaka same as puñja Miln. 342. (Page 440)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

palāla (पलाल).—n m S Rice-straw: also straw or culm gen.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

palāla (पलाल).—n m Rice-straw; straw or cuimgen.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Palala (पलल).—A demon, goblin, an evil spirit.

-lam 1 Flesh.

2) Mire, mud.

3) A sweetmeat made of ground sesamum and sugar.

Derivable forms: palalaḥ (पललः).

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Palāla (पलाल).—Straw, husk; Mahābhārata (Bombay) 13.79.17; Manusmṛti 5. 122; पलालजालैः पिहितः स्वयं हि प्रकाशमासादयतीक्षुडिम्भः (palālajālaiḥ pihitaḥ svayaṃ hi prakāśamāsādayatīkṣuḍimbhaḥ) N.8.2.

Derivable forms: palālaḥ (पलालः), palālam (पलालम्).

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Pālala (पालल).—a. (- f.) Made of the powdered sesamumseed.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Palala (पलल).—n.

(-laṃ) 1. Flesh. 2. Mud, mire, clay. 2. Oil-cake or sesamum seed. m.

(-laḥ) A Rakshasa, a goblin or imp. E. pal to go, Unadi aff. kalac; or pala flesh, and to get, aff. ka.

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Palāla (पलाल).—mn.

(-laḥ-laṃ) Straw. E. pal to go, Unadi aff. kālan.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Palala (पलल).—n. (and m.). 1. Pounded sesamum, [Harivaṃśa, (ed. Calc.)] 7362. 2. Mire, mud, [Rāmāyaṇa] 5, 87, 26.

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Palāla (पलाल).—I. m. and n. 1. Straw, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 5, 122. 2. The stalk of Sorghum. Ii. f. , A proper name.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Palala (पलल).—[neuter] ground sesamum seeds, pap; mud, mire.

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Palāla (पलाल).—[neuter] ī [feminine] stalk, straw.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Palala (पलल):—[from pala] m. a Rākṣasa, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] n. ground sesamum, [Harivaṃśa; Varāha-mihira; Suśruta] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] a kind of sweetmeat made of g° s° and sugar, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] mud, mire, [Rāmāyaṇa]

5) [v.s. ...] flesh, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Palāla (पलाल):—[from pala] mn. a stalk, straw, [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

7) [v.s. ...] the stalk of the Sorghum, Indian millet, [Suśruta]

8) [v.s. ...] m. Name of a demon inimical to children (anu-p), [Atharva-veda]

9) Palālā (पलाला):—[from palāla > pala] f. Name of one of the Mātṛs of Skanda, [Mahābhārata]

10) Pālala (पालल):—mf(ī)n. ([from] palala) made of powdered sesamum seed, [Suśruta]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Palala (पलल):—[pala-la] (laṃ) 1. n. Flesh; mud; pounded sesamum. m. A goblin.

2) Palāla (पलाल):—[(laḥ-laṃ)] 1. m. n. Straw.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Palala (पलल) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Palala, Palāla.

[Sanskrit to German]

Palala in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Palala (पलल) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Palala.

2) Palāla (पलाल) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Pralāla.

3) Palāla (पलाल) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Palāla.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Palala (ಪಲಲ):—[noun] = ಪಲವಲ [palavala].

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Palala (ಪಲಲ):—[noun] the flesh of animals used as food; meat.

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Palāla (ಪಲಾಲ):—

1) [noun] any of various plants of the grass family that are usu. used for food, fodder or grazing and as lawns; grass.

2) [noun] the main stem of a plant (esp. as of an amaranth plant).

3) [noun] (fig.) a useless, worthless thing.

4) [noun] empty, worthless or hollow talk.

5) [noun] a pretending to be what one is not; a pretentious behaviour.

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Paḷāḷa (ಪಳಾಳ):—

1) [noun] any of various plants of the grass family that are usu. used for food, fodder or grazing and as lawns; grass.

2) [noun] the main stem of a plant (esp. as of an amaranth plant).

3) [noun] (fig.) a useless, worthless thing.

4) [noun] empty, worthless or hollow talk.

5) [noun] a pretending to be what one is not; a pretentious behaviour.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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