On, aka: Oṅ, Oṇ; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

On means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Oṅ (ओङ्).—A term used by ancient grammarians for the affix औ (au) of the nom. and the acc. dual. The vowel ई (ī) (शी (śī)) is substituted for औ (au) in the case of nouns of the feminine and neuter genders; cf. औङः शी (auṅaḥ śī) P. VII. 1.18, 19.

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar
context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Oṇ (ओण्).—1 P. (oṇati, oṇitum) To remove, take or drag along.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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