Nyingmapa, aka: Nyingma Pa; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Nyingmapa means something in Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

The Nyingmapa, a Red Hat sect of Tibetan Buddhism, incorporate local religious practices and local deities and elements of shamanism, which is shared with Bon. The group particularly believes in hidden terma treasures. Traditionally, Nyingmapa practice was advanced orally among a loose network of lay practitioners. Monasteries with celibate monks and nuns, along with the practice of reincarnated spiritual leaders are later adaptations.

Historically, Nyingmapa are categorised into Red Sangha and White Sangha. Red Sangha denotes a celibate, monastic practitioner; whereas White Sangha denotes a non-celibate practitioner who abstains from vows of celibacy. At different times in one's life, due to changing circumstances and proclivities, individuals historically moved between these two Sanghas. Rarely was either determination of Red or White for the duration of one's life.

Source: WikiPedia: Tibetan Buddhism
Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

Discover the meaning of nyingmapa in the context of Tibetan Buddhism from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Buddhism)

Nyingmapa in Buddhism glossary... « previous · [N] · next »

Nyingma (rnying-ma), Tib., lit. “School of the Ancients”; one of the four princi­pal schools of Tibetan Buddhism. The school brings together the oldest Buddhist traditions of Tibet, which were brought to the country from India by Padmasambhava and the monks Vi­malamitra and Vairochana in the 8th century. Since the 15th century there has existed an inde­pendent collection of these teachings, which, however, is not included in the official Tibetan canon. The Nyingmapas consider dzogchen to be the supreme doc­trine; the systematization of the dzogchen teach­ing by Lonchenpa and his commentary on it are considered authoritative.

Source: Shambala Publications: General

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