Nitha, Nītha, Ñiṭha: 9 definitions

Introduction

Nitha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Ñiṭha (ञिठ).—tad. affix इक (ika) added to words headed by काशी (kāśī) as also to words meaning a village in the Vahika country optionally with the affix ठञ् (ṭhañ) in the Saisika senses;e.g. काशिका, काशिकी, बैदिका, बेदिकी, शाकलिकां, शाक-लिकी (kāśikā, kāśikī, baidikā, bedikī, śākalikāṃ, śāka-likī). The affixes ठञ् (ṭhañ) and ञिठ (ñiṭha) are added to the word काल (kāla) preceded by आपद् (āpad) as also by some other words; e. g. आपत्कालिका, आपत्कालिकी तात्कालिका, तात्कालिकी (āpatkālikā, āpatkālikī tātkālikā, tātkālikī) etc.; cf. P. IV.2. 116,117,118 and Varttika on IV. 2.116.

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Nītha (नीथ).—A king born in the Vṛṣṇi dynasty. (Vana Parva, Chapter 120, Verse 9).

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

A Pacceka Buddha, mentioned in a nominal list. M.iii.69; ApA.106.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Nītha (नीथ) or Nīthi is the name of a dung-sweeper who was converted by  the Buddha and made a great Arhat, according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter XLI. Accordingly, “Nītha (?) was a refuse-sweeper. His long hair hung down in disorder; he was filthy and his clothes were in tatters. When he found a rag on his way, he used it to mend his garments. On his back he carried a jar full of refuse. One day when the Buddha was visiting Rājagṛha, Nītha, lowly and impure, did not dare to come near him for fear of increasing his misdeeds further. He took flight across the city, but at each corner the Buddha appeared before him. The Teacher said to him: ‘Although your body is impure, your heart possesses the excellent and wonderful perfume of the Dharma. You must not think of yourself as lowly’. Having received the Buddha’s teaching, Nītha entered the religious life and became an Aarhat”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nītha (नीथ).—Ved.

1) Leading, guiding.

2) A guide, leader.

-thā A way, trick, art.

-thā, -tham A mode in music, a song.

Derivable forms: nīthaḥ (नीथः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nītha (नीथ).—m. (thaḥ) A guider, a leader. n.

(-thaṃ) Water. E. to guide, kthan Unadi aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nītha (नीथ).—[nī + tha], m. Guiding.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nītha (नीथ).—[masculine] a man’s name (lit. leader); [neuter] nītha musical mode or song; [feminine] nīthā way, trick, artifice.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nītha (नीथ):—[from ] m. leading or a leader, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] Name of a man, [Mahābhārata]

3) Nīthā (नीथा):—[from nītha > nī] f. way, trick, art, stratagem, [Ṛg-veda]

4) [v.s. ...] also = (nītha) n. a mode in music, musical mode or air, song, hymn, [ib.]

5) [v.s. ...] water, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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