Nishcala, Niścalā, Niścala: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Nishcala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Niścalā and Niścala can be transliterated into English as Niscala or Nishcala, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Nishchala.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Nishcala in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Niścala (निश्चल).—A son of Atri, and one of the seven sages of the Svārociṣa epoch.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 36. 18.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of nishcala or niscala in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Raj Nighantu

Niścalā (निश्चला) refers to “earth” and is mentioned in a list of 53 synonyms for dharaṇi (“earth”), according to the second chapter (dharaṇyādi-varga) of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu (an Ayurvedic encyclopedia).  The Dharaṇyādi-varga covers the lands, soil [viz., Niścalā], mountains, jungles and vegetation’s relations between trees and plants and substances, with their various kinds.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Niścalā (निश्चला) is another name for Śāliparṇī, a medicinal plant identified with Desmodium gangeticum (sal leaved desmodium), from the Fabaceae or “legume” family of flowering plants, according to verse 4.17-20 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Niścalā and Śāliparṇī, there are a total of twenty-nine Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Discover the meaning of nishcala or niscala in the context of Ayurveda from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Niścala (निश्चल) refers to “fixed” (e.g., ‘one whose consciousnesses is fixed on reality’), according to the Mālinīvijayottaratantra, chapter 18 (“appropriate conduct of the accomplished Yogin”) verses 18.74-81 (as quoted in the Tantrāloka verse 4.213-221ab).—Accordingly, “[...] Moreover, the one whose consciousness is fixed (niścala-citta) on reality, partaking even in the pleasures of the senses, is not touched by bad consequences, just as the petal of a lotus (is not affected) by water. The Yogin who has great understanding is the one who is similar to the person who, armed with mantras that counteract poison and the like, is not deluded by the poison even while devouring it”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of nishcala or niscala in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Niścala (निश्चल) refers to “immobile”, according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra, the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “[...] If one worships those feet, immobile (niścalayadi niścalatā) on (one’s) head, as the form of the teacher, the (divine) qualities of realisation (manifest along) with the eight yogic powers and Śambhu’s plane. I have explained how the three are imperceptible to anyone who does not possess the Command.  [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of nishcala or niscala in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Niścala (निश्चल) refers to a “steady (mind)”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “[...] By whichever posture they may make the mind steady (niścalaṃ manaḥ), that same pleasant posture ought to be done by mendicants. Abandonment of the body and sitting cross-legged are said by some [to be] better for embodied souls now because of lack of strength due to the degeneracy of the times”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of nishcala or niscala in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

niścala (निश्चल).—a (S) pop. niścaḷa a That is without motion, still, fixed, firm, steady, lit. fig. 2 as ad Still.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of nishcala or niscala in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Niścala (निश्चल).—a.

1) Immovable, steady, fixed, still.

2) Invariable, unchangeable; श्रुतिविप्रतिपन्ना ते यदा स्थास्यति निश्चला (śrutivipratipannā te yadā sthāsyati niścalā) Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 2.53.

-lā The earth.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niścala (निश्चल).—mfn.

(-laḥ-lā-lī-laṃ) 1. Immoveable, still, fixed. 2. Invariable. f. () The earth. E. nir privat. cala what goes or moves.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niścala (निश्चल).—[adjective] immovable, invariable.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Niścala (निश्चल):—[=niś-cala] [from niś > niḥ] mf(ā)n. motionless, immovable, fixed, steady, invariable, unchangeable, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) Niścalā (निश्चला):—[=niś-calā] [from niś-cala > niś > niḥ] f. the earth, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] Desmodiuni Gangeticum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niścala (निश्चल):—[niśca+la] (laḥ-lā-laṃ) a. Immoveable, fixed. f. The earth.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Niścala (निश्चल) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Ṇiccala.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nishcala in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of nishcala or niscala in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nishcala in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Niścala (निश्चल) [Also spelled nischal]:—(a) steady; unwavering; quiet; quiescent; immovable; immobile; stationary; hence ~[] (nf).

context information

...

Discover the meaning of nishcala or niscala in the context of Hindi from relevant books on Exotic India

Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Niścala (ನಿಶ್ಚಲ):—

1) [adjective] not moving; immobile.

2) [adjective] not flickering; not wavering.

3) [adjective] firm in character, purpose or resolution; steadfast.

4) [adjective] concentrating or concentrated; with only one aim or purpose.

--- OR ---

Niścala (ನಿಶ್ಚಲ):—

1) [noun] the state of being immobile.

2) [noun] that which does not move, as a mountain, tree, etc.

3) [noun] the earth.

4) [noun] a man who is not moving.

5) [noun] a man having only one aim or purpose and not detracted towards others.

--- OR ---

Niścaḷa (ನಿಶ್ಚಳ):—[adjective] = ನಿಶ್ಚಲ [nishcala]1.

--- OR ---

Niścaḷa (ನಿಶ್ಚಳ):—[noun] = ನಿಶ್ಚಲ [nishcala]2.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

Discover the meaning of nishcala or niscala in the context of Kannada from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: