Nisa, Nisā, Niśā, Nisha, Niśa, Nishe: 28 definitions

Introduction:

Nisa means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Niśā and Niśa can be transliterated into English as Nisa or Nisha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Niśā (निशा):—Another name for Haridrā (Curcuma longa), a species of medicinal plant and used in the treatment of fever (jvara), as described in the Jvaracikitsā (or “the treatment of fever”) which is part of the 7th-century Mādhavacikitsā, a Sanskrit classical work on Āyurveda.

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Nisa in the Marathi language is the name of a plant identified with Zingiber purpureum Roscoe from the Zingiberaceae (Ginger) family having the following synonyms: Zingiber cassumunar, Zingiber montanum auct. non (J.Koenig) Theilade. For the possible medicinal usage of nisa, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Niśā (निशा) is another name for “Haridrā” and is dealt with in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning niśā] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Niśā (निशा).—The third wife of the Agni called Bhānu. To the couple were born seven sons called Agni, Soma, Vaiśvānara, Viśvapati, Sannihita, Kapila and Agraṇī, and a daughter called Rohiṇī. (Vana Parva, Chapter 211).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Niśā (निशा).—Same as Sītā; a R. of the Kuśadvīpa.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 122. 71.

1b) A daughter of Krodhā.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 205.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

1) Niśā (निशा) is the alternative name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) mentioned by Hemacandra (1088-1173 C.E.) in his auto-commentary on the second chapter of the Chandonuśāsana. Niśā corresponds to Tārakā. Hemacandra gives these alternative names for the metres by other authorities (like Bharata), even though the number of gaṇas or letters do not differ.

2) Niśā (निशा) refers to one of the 135 metres (chandas) mentioned by Nañjuṇḍa (1794-1868 C.E.) in his Vṛttaratnāvalī. Nañjuṇḍa was a poet of both Kannada and Sanskrit literature flourished in the court of the famous Kṛṣṇarāja Woḍeyar of Mysore. He introduces the names of these metres (e.g., Niśā) in 20 verses.

Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Niśā (निशा) refers to a “night”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 11), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).— Accordingly, “Kumuda Ketu is a comet of the colour of the white water lily. It appears in the west with its tail pointing to the east and is visible only for a night [i.e., niśāniśām ekām]. When it appears there will be unprecedented happiness in the land for a period of ten years. Maṇi Ketu is a comet which appears for only 3 hours occasionally; it possesses an invisible disc and appears in the west; its tail is straight and white and it resembles a line of milk drawn from a human breast. There will be happiness in the land from the very time of its appearance for four and a half months; reptiles and venomous creatures will come into existence”.

Source: Google Books: Studies in the History of the Exact Sciences (Astronomy)

Niśa (निश) refers to a “night”, according to Brahmagupta’s Brāhmasphuṭasiddhānta verse 22.41.—Accordingly, “The Ghaṭikā-yantra is a copper vessel of the shape of a hemisphere. At the centre of the bottom is a small perforation so made that the bowl sinks sixty times in a day and night [i.e., dyu-niśa]”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Niśā (निशा) or Rātri refers to the “night”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “(The Śāmbhava yogi) has the authority (to perform the rites), knows the scripture and has a consort. [...] The observance of the teacher’s dictates is his vow. He resides in a mountain cave. Having established his space, he fasts and eats roots and bulbs. He is a regular initiate and eats what he has begged from houses. He is a yogi who lives in the forest. Free of duality and craving, he is intent on practicing Yoga at night [i.e., niśā]. Free of being and non-being, he is wrapped in an old blanket. ”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Yoga (school of philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (yoga)

Niśa (निश) refers to the “night”, according to the Amṛtasiddhi, a 12th-century text belonging to the Haṭhayoga textual tradition.—Accordingly, “The moon is on the peak of Meru and has sixteen digits. Facing downwards, it rains dewy nectar day and night (ahar-niśa)”.

Yoga book cover
context information

Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: archive.org: Bulletin of the French School of the Far East (volume 5)

Nisa (निस) [?] [or Niva, Nikusa, Nikuva ?] (in Chinese: Ni[Kiu]-so[p'o]) is the name of an ancient kingdom associated with Mṛgaśiras or Mṛgaśirasnakṣatra, as mentioned in chapter 18 of the Candragarbha: the 55th section of the Mahāsaṃnipāta-sūtra, a large compilation of Sūtras (texts) in Mahāyāna Buddhism partly available in Sanskrit, Tibetan and Chinese.—Chapter 18 deals with geographical astrology and, in conversation with Brahmarāja and others, Buddha explains how he entrusts the Nakṣatras [e.g., Mṛgaśiras] with a group of kingdoms [e.g., Nisa] for the sake of protection and prosperity.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

nisā : (f.) night.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Nisā, (f.) (Sk. niś & niśā, prob. with niśītha (midnight) to ni+śi=lying down) night Vv 352 (Loc. nise); VvA. 161 (Loc. nisati, v. l. nisi=rattiyaṃ); Miln. 388 (Loc. nisāya); Dāvs II. 6; V, 2 (nisāyaṃ). See also nisītha. (Page 373)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

niśā (निशा).—f ( P) Assurance, confidence, conviction or satisfaction of mind. v kara, hō, purava. 2 Assurance, testimony of credit. v dē, ghē, paṭava, purava. Ex. mī pāñcaśēṃ rūpayāñcī niśā sāvakārī dētōṃ. 3 Satiety or gluttedness.

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niśā (निशा).—f ( A) Intoxication: also any intoxicating substance.

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niśā (निशा).—f S Night.

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nīsa (नीस).—m (nisaṇēṃ) Sum, substance, essence; the extract or excerptum; the good portion picked out. v kāḍha, nigha. 2 Scrutiny or close inquiry into. v kara, kāḍha, pāha, purava g. of o. 3 nīsa is sometimes used as ad or in comp. with the sense Essentially or purely, i. e. altogether, utterly; as nīsa naṅgā Wholly bare, void, or destitute (of money, decency &c.)

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nīsa (नीस).—m R Sense of soreness (in the breast or back) from a blow or from overexertion. v bhara, utara.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

niśā (निशा).—f Assurance, confidence, conviction or satisfaction of mind. v kara, hō, purava.

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niśā (निशा).—f Satiety. Intoxication. Night.

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nīsa (नीस).—m Sum, substance, essence; the extract or excerptum; the good por- tion picked out. v kāḍha nigha. Scrutiny or close inquiry into. v kara, kāḍha, pāha, purava, nīsa is sometimes used as ad or in comp., with the sense Essentially or purely, i. e. altogether, utterly; as nīsa naṅgā. Wholly bare, void, or desti- tute (of money, decency &c.)

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nīsa (नीस).—m Sense of soreness in the breast or back from a blow or from over- exertion. Substance. Scrutiny. ad Altogether.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Niśa (निश).—4 P., 1 U.

1) To hear, listen to, come to know; निशम्य चैनां तपसे कृतोद्यमाम् (niśamya caināṃ tapase kṛtodyamām) Kumārasambhava 5.3; Ś.5.2; R.2.41,52,61;3.47;4.2;5.12; Bhaṭṭikāvya 2.9; निशामय प्रियसखि (niśāmaya priyasakhi) Mālatīmādhava (Bombay) 7.

2) To see, observe; निशामयन् दीप्तमिवाग्निना जगत् (niśāmayan dīptamivāgninā jagat) Bu. Ch.4.98.

Derivable forms: niśam (निशम्).

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Niśā (निशा).—[nitarāṃ śyati tanūkaroti vyāpārān śo-ka Tv.]

1) Night या निशा सर्वभूतानां तस्यां जागर्ति संयमी (yā niśā sarvabhūtānāṃ tasyāṃ jāgarti saṃyamī) Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 2.69.

2) Turmeric.

3) A dream.

4) A collective name for the zodiacal signs Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, Sagittarius, and Capricorn.

5) A species of plant (Mar. kacarā or upaḷasarī).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niśā (निशा).—f.

(-śā) 1. Night. 2. Turmeric, (Curcuma longa.) 3. Another sort, (C. zanthorrhiza.) E. ni always, śo to waste or reduce, (mortals,) aff. ka; or niś to meditate, aff. kvip, and ṭāpa added.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niśa (निश).—[-niśa] (cf. niśā), in a-niśa + m, adv. (Without rest) continually, [Śiśupālavadha] 9, 61. ahar-niśa, n. A whole day, comprising a day and a night, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 1, 74. divā-niśa + m, adv. Day and night, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 7, 44. niśā-niśa + m, adv. Constantly, Mahābhārata 3, 12343.

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Niśā (निशा).—probably from ni-śī, (cf. niśitha), f. 1. Night, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 11, 223. 2. A dream, Mahābhārata 5, 7252. 3. Turmeric, Curcuma, [Suśruta] 2. 208, 14.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niśa (निश).—(—°) [neuter] & niśā [feminine] the same.

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Niśā (निशा).—sharpen, whet; offer, present; lay down, spread.

Niśā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms ni and śā (शा).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Niśa (निश):—[from niś] n. (or am ind.) ifc. for niśā (cf. a-, ahar-, divā-, niśā-, śva-, and, [Pāṇini 2-4, 25]).

2) Niśā (निशा):—[from niś] f. night, [Gṛhya-sūtra and śrauta-sūtra; Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] a vision, dream, [Mahābhārata]

4) [v.s. ...] turmeric, Curcuma (of 2 species, [probably] C° and C°), [Suśruta]

5) [v.s. ...] = -bala, [Jyotiṣa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Niśā (निशा):—(śā) 1. f. Night; turmeric.

2) Niṣa (निष):—(u) neṣati 1. a. To sprinkle.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Niśā (निशा) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Ṇisā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nisa in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Niśā (निशा):—(nf) night; ~[kara] the moon; ~[cara] a demon; evil spirit; ~[carī] demonic; •[vṛtti] demonic spirit; ~[nātha] the moon.

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Ṇisa (णिस) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Nyas.

2) Ṇisā (णिसा) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Niśā.

3) Ṇisā (णिसा) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Niśā.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Niśā (ನಿಶಾ):—[noun] = ನಿಶೆ [nishe]2.

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Niśe (ನಿಶೆ):—

1) [noun] the period from sunset to sunrise; night.

2) [noun] absence of light; darkness.

3) [noun] turmeric powder.

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Niśe (ನಿಶೆ):—[noun] a feeling of wild excitement as caused by alcohol consumed; intoxication; inebriation.

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Niṣā (ನಿಷಾ):—[noun] a feeling of wild excitement as caused by alcohol consumed; intoxication; inebriation.

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Nise (ನಿಸೆ):—

1) [noun] the period from sunset to sunrise; night.

2) [noun] the quality or state of being black; blackness.

3) [noun] black colour.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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