Nirmalya, Nirmālya: 12 definitions

Introduction:

Nirmalya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Shodhganga: Temple management in the Āgamas

Nirmālya (निर्माल्य) refers to “everything offered to the Lord and everything that is his property” according to the Uttara-Kāmikāgama (prāyaścittavidhi-paṭala).—Anything enjoyed by the Lord becomes purified and spotless. The pūjā, the naivedya, gandha, puṣpa, the flower garland (after being offered) and so on are called nirmālya. The Āgama declares that even the speck of dust on a śivaliṅga should not be desired, since it has been enjoyed by Śiva and is intended for Caṇḍeśa.

An important role of administration is to ensure that the nirmālya is not misused. Nirmālya is classified into six:

  1. devasva,
  2. devatādravya,
  3. naivedya,
  4. nivedita,
  5. caṇḍadravya,
  6. nirmālya.

Nirmālya is the remains of the pūjā that is discarded. Even the food offerings on the balipīṭha is considered nirmālya. One who gives away nirmālya to others (not qualified) is reborn as a rākṣasa. One who eats nirmālya (without being qualified for it) is reborn as an elephant. Crossing nirmālya destroys mantrasiddhi. One who sells nirmālya is reborn as a hunter. One who touches nirmālya attains womanhood. These are, without doubt, the effects of misusing nirmālya.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

nirmālya (निर्माल्य).—n m (S) Flowers and other articles of an offering now become stale. 2 Flowers &c. which, by handling, are become unfit to be offered. 3 A person or thing worn out of favor or notice, fallen in estimation, become stale and worthless.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

nirmālya (निर्माल्य).—n m Flowers &c. of an offering now become stale. Flowers &c., which, by handling, are become unfit to be offered. A person or thing worn out of favour or notice, faller in estimation, become stale and worthless.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nirmālya (निर्माल्य).—a. Pure, clean, stainless.

-lyam 1 Purity, clearness, stainlessnes.

2) The remains of an offering to a deity, such as flowers; निर्माल्योज्झितपुष्पदामनिकरे का षट्- पदानां रतिः (nirmālyojjhitapuṣpadāmanikare kā ṣaṭ- padānāṃ ratiḥ) Ś. Til.1.

3) Flowers used and cast off, faded or withered flowers; निर्माल्यैरथ ननृतेऽवधीरितानां (nirmālyairatha nanṛte'vadhīritānāṃ) Si.8.6.

4) Remains in general; निर्माल्यं नयनश्रियः कुवलयम् (nirmālyaṃ nayanaśriyaḥ kuvalayam) B. R.1.4.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nirmālya (निर्माल्य).—i. e. nis-mālya (= mala + ya), n. The remains of an offering to a deity, Mahābhārata 1, 3061.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nirmālya (निर्माल्य).—[adjective] cast out or left (from a garland), useless; [neuter] the leavings of a sacrifice, [especially] flowers.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nirmālya (निर्माल्य):—[=nir-mālya] [from nir > niḥ] mfn. cast out or left from a garland, useless, unfit, [Gṛhyāsaṃgraha; Vajracchedikā] (-tā f.)

2) [v.s. ...] worn the day before, [Daśakumāra-carita]

3) [v.s. ...] = nir-mala, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Nirmālyā (निर्माल्या):—[=nir-mālyā] [from nir-mālya > nir > niḥ] f. Trigonella Corniculata, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) Nirmālya (निर्माल्य):—[=nir-mālya] [from nir > niḥ] n. the remains of an offering to a deity, flowers left at a sacrificial ceremony, [Mahābhārata]

6) [v.s. ...] the remains id est. a feeble reflex of ([genitive case]), Balar. i, 40

7) [v.s. ...] stainlessness, purity, [Horace H. Wilson]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nirmālya (निर्माल्य):—[nir-mālya] (lyaṃ) 1. n. Remains of an offering; purity. f. (lyā) A medicinal plant. a. Clean, pure.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Nirmālya (निर्माल्य) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Omalla, Ṇimmalla.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nirmalya in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Nirmālya (ನಿರ್ಮಾಲ್ಯ):—

1) [noun] the quality or condition of being pure; purity.

2) [noun] a flower or leaf of a plant that is offered in devotion to a god.

3) [noun] a thing that is offered to a person (which is considered impure for another’s use).

4) [noun] a becoming stale.

5) [noun] a flower or flowers that was once worn by a person.

6) [noun] the plant Trigonella corniculata of Papilionaceae family.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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