Nirjhara: 16 definitions

Introduction:

Nirjhara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Nirjhar.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Nirjhara in Purana glossary
Source: valmikiramayan.net: Srimad Valmiki Ramayana

Nirjhara (निर्झर) refers to “waterfalls” (in hills), according to the Rāmāyaṇa verse 2.28.7. Accordingly:—“[...] soothening with kind words to Sītā, when eyes were blemished with tears, the virtuous Rāma spoke again as follows, for the purpose of waking her turn back: ‘[...] the sounds created from waterfalls in hills (giri-nirjhara) and from lions residing in mountain caves are unpleasant to hear. That is why living in a forest in uncomfortable’”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Nirjhara in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Nirjhara (निर्झर) refers to a “torrent”, as mentioned in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 108. Accordingly, “[...] The next day [Naravāhanadatta] deposited his wives in Mātaṅgapura, and went with the Vidyādhara kings to Govindakūṭa. There Gaurīmuṇḍa and Mānasavega came out to fight with them, and Caṇḍasiṃha and his colleagues met them face to face. When the battle began, brave warriors fell like trees marked out for the axe, and torrents of blood flowed [i.e., sravadrudhira-nirjhara] on the mountain Govindakūṭa.”.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Nirjhara (निर्झर) refers to “caves”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 12), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “Hear now the effects of the heliacal rising of Canopus (Agastya), a star sacred to Agastya who suppressed the Vindhya mountains whose soaring heights obstructed the course of the Sun; to which the pictured robes of the Vidyādhara females leaning for support on their lord’s arms and flying aloft in the sky formed beautiful flowing flags; whose caves were the abodes of lions which, having drunk of the perfumed blood of elephants in rut had their mouths covered with bees that looked like so many black flowers, and from which caves issued rivers [i.e., antar-darī-nirjhara]; [...]”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

nirjhara (निर्झर).—m S A spring (of water). 2 A precipitous descent of water, a torrent.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

nirjhara (निर्झर).—m A spring. A torrent.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nirjhara (निर्झर).—1 A spring, waterfall, cataract, cascade, mountain-torrent; शीतं निर्झरवारि पानम् (śītaṃ nirjharavāri pānam) Nāg.4; R.2.13; Śānti.2.17,21;4.6.

-raḥ 1 Burning chaff.

2) An elephant.

3) A horse of the sun.

Derivable forms: nirjharaḥ (निर्झरः), nirjharam (निर्झरम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nirjhara (निर्झर).—mf. (-raḥ-rī) A cascade or torrent, the precipitous descent of water from mountains, &c., f. (-rī) A river. m.

(-raḥ) 1. A horse of the sun. 2. A fire of chaff. 3. An elephant. E. nir before, jhṛ to waste, and ap aff. (jharaṇā .)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nirjhara (निर्झर).—probably a form of nis-kṣar + a, m. (also n. [Rāmāyaṇa] 4, 13, 6), A cascade or torrent, [Rāmāyaṇa] 2, 28, 7; [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 6, 4, 41.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nirjhara (निर्झर).—[masculine] ([neuter]) ṇa [neuter] waterfall, cataract.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nirjhara (निर्झर):—[=nir-jhara] m. (cf. jhara, jharat) a waterfall, cataract, mountain torrent, cascade, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc. (also n., [Rāmāyaṇa iv, 13, 6]; f(ī). , [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]; ifc. fā., [Śāntiśataka], and raṇa n., [Pañcadaṇḍacchattra-prabandha])

2) [v.s. ...] burning chaff, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] an elephant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] Name of one of the horses of the Sun, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] (cf. nirṇara)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nirjhara (निर्झर):—[nir-jhara] (raḥ) 1. m. A cascade or torrent. m. Horse of the sun; fire of chaff. f. () A river.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Nirjhara (निर्झर) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Ujjhara, Ojjhara, Ṇijjhara.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nirjhara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nirjhara in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Nirjhara (निर्झर) [Also spelled nirjhar]:—(nm) a fall, cataract, spring, stream, torrent; ~[riṇī] a stream, rivutet; ~[] see [nirjhariṇī].

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Nirjhara (ನಿರ್ಝರ):—[noun] a stream flowing down from a hill or mountain.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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