Nirbhara, Nir-bhara: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Nirbhara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Nirbhar.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Nirbhara (निर्भर) means “full of” (e.g., full of the bliss of love games), according to the second recension of the Yogakhaṇḍa of the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “Thus (the goddess) was delighted in Śaṃkara and full of the bliss of (love) games [i.e., nirbharakrīḍanānandanirbharā]. The goddess who bestows boons (to all) and to Śaṃkara, spoke: ‘In (this my) eighth birth having enjoyed pleasure (bhoga), with me, this is the debt that remains. We have mutually enjoyed the false object of enjoyment as it is (in the world and created) by Māyā. [...]’”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Nirbhara in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Nirbhara (निर्भर) refers to “(that which is) full with”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.25 (“The seven celestial sages test Pārvatī”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Naradā: “[...] Immediately on being remembered, the seven sages came there with faces beaming with delight and praising their good fate. Bowing to Him with folded arms and bent shoulders they eulogised lord Śiva with extreme pleasure [i.e., harṣa-nirbhara] by means of words choked with devotional feelings”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Nirbhara (निर्भर) refers to “overflowing (with joy)”, consisting of four stages, according to Abhinava’s Tantrāloka verse 10.278.—Accordingly, while defining turyātīta: “That [state] whose beautiful nature is full and undivided, overflowing with joy (ānanda-nirbhara), is called Beyond the Fourth; that alone is the supreme state”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

nirbhara (निर्भर).—a (S Poetry.) Filled with; as ānanda- nirbhara, śōkanirbhara, lōbhanirbhara.

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nirbhara (निर्भर).—m (S Much, excessive.) Intent and pertinacious pursuit or purpose; determined bent or bearing (of the mind or affections); fullness of delight in or appetency for. v dhara, ṭhēva, rākha. 2 Complete conversancy with. 3 Reliance, trust, resting upon.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

nirbhara (निर्भर).—a Filled with.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nirbhara (निर्भर).—a.

1) excessive, vehement, violent, much, strong; त्रपाभरनिर्भर- स्मरशर (trapābharanirbhara- smaraśara) &c. Gītagovinda 12; तन्व्यास्तिष्ठतु निर्भरप्रणयिता मानोऽपि रम्यो- दयः (tanvyāstiṣṭhatu nirbharapraṇayitā māno'pi ramyo- dayaḥ) Amaruśataka 47.

2) ardent.

3) fast, close (as embrace); कुचकुम्भनिर्भरपरीरम्भामृतं वाञ्छति (kucakumbhanirbharaparīrambhāmṛtaṃ vāñchati) Gīt.; परिरभ्य निर्भरम् (parirabhya nirbharam) Gītagovinda 1.

4) sound, deep (as sleep).

5) full of, filled with (at the end of comp.); आनन्द°, गर्व° (ānanda°, garva°) &c.

-raḥ a servant receiving no wages.

-ram excess.

-ram ind.)

Nirbhara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms nir and bhara (भर).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nirbhara (निर्भर).—mfn.

(-raḥ-rā-raṃ) 1. Much, excessive. 2. Fearless. 3. A servant employed without a pay. n. adv.

(-raṃ) Much, excessively, subs. Pith, essence. E. nir before, bhṛ to fill, affix ap.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nirbhara (निर्भर).—I. adj., f. . 1. excessive, violent, ardent, Böhtl. Ind. Spr. 396. 2. deep (as sleep), [Hitopadeśa] 85, 8. 3. latter part of comp. adj. full of, [Pañcatantra] 259, 3; [Kathāsaritsāgara, (ed. Brockhaus.)] 6, 126. Ii. ºram, adv. much, excessively, [Hitopadeśa] 86, 8; 10; [Hitopadeśa] 50, 2 (deeply).

Nirbhara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms nis and bhara (भर).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nirbhara (निर्भर).—[adjective] excessive, violent, full of (—°); °— & [neuter] [adverb]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nirbhara (निर्भर):—[=nir-bhara] [from nir > niḥ] mf(ā)n. ‘without weight or measure’, excessive, vehement, violent

2) [v.s. ...] deep, sound (as sleep), ardent (as an embrace), [Kāvya literature] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] full of, abounding in [Kathāsaritsāgara; Purāṇa] etc. (also rita with [instrumental case] [Catalogue(s)])

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nirbhara (निर्भर):—[nir-bhara] (raṃ) 1. n. Pith, essence. a. Much; fearless. adv. Excessively.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nirbhara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nirbhara in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Nirbhara (निर्भर) [Also spelled nirbhar]:—(a) dependent; based (on); subject or subordinate (to), depending (on), relying (on); ~[] dependence; subjection/subordination; reliance; —[honā] to depend, to be dependent; to rely; to base; to be subject or subordinate (to).

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Nirbhara (ನಿರ್ಭರ):—

1) [adjective] too much or too great.

2) [adjective] filled with; full.

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Nirbhara (ನಿರ್ಭರ):—

1) [noun] the quality of being characterised by inensity, force; vehemence.

2) [noun] the quality of being cruel or brutal; brutality; barbarity; cruelty.

3) [noun] the condition of being filled with; fullness; abundance; plentifulness.

4) [noun] earnest and all-out effort (putforth in achieving something).

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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