Nimesha, Nimesa, Nimeṣa: 25 definitions

Introduction:

Nimesha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Nimeṣa can be transliterated into English as Nimesa or Nimesha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Nimesh.

In Hinduism

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Google Books: Manusmṛti with the Manubhāṣya

Nimeṣa (निमेष) is the natural winking of the Eye-lashes, which accompanies every opening of the eye. Other people have declared that ‘Nimēṣa’ is that time which is taken in the distinct utterance of one letter-sound.

Eighteen ‘Nimeṣas’ go to make that measure of time which is known as ‘Kāṣṭhā’; thirty ‘Kāṣṭhās’ make one ‘Kalā’; thirty ‘Kalās’ make one ‘Muhūrta,’ and thirty ‘Muhurtas’ make one ‘Ahorātra’ (Day and Night).
 

Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Nimeṣa (निमेष).—A son of Garuḍa. (Udyoga Parva, Chapter 104, Verse 10).

2) Nimeṣa (निमेष).—See under Kālamāna.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Nimeṣa (निमेष).—A small unit of time measured by the wink of the eye;1 from Nimi: 15 of them equal a Kāṣṭḥa2 the same mātra for laghvakṣara such as {#a, Dha, u#} some equal to a laghvakṣara.3

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 21. 116, 126; 29. 6; 24. 143.
  • 2) Matsya-purāṇa 61. 35; 142. 3; 201. 19; Vāyu-purāṇa 50. 179; Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 3. 8; VI. 3. 6.
  • 3) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 13. 16 and 111; Vāyu-purāṇa 31. 24; 30. 13; 53. 115; 57. 6; 100. 213; 104. 33.

1b) (Vaiṣṇava)—equal to 100 Śaiva years; when Viṣṇu wakes up, the world is active and when he sleeps the world is sleepy.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 290. 21-2.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Nimeṣa (निमेष) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.28.19) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Nimeṣa) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Nimeṣa (निमेष, “closing”) refers to a specific gesture (āṅgika) made with the eyelids (puṭa), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. These gestures of the eyelids (puṭa) are supposed to follow the corresponding movements of the eyeballs (tārā). These gestures form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

Source: archive.org: Natya Shastra

Nimeṣa (निमेष, “closing”).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with the eyelids (puṭa);—Instructions: bringing together the eyelids. Uses: in anger (krodha).

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (shastra) of performing arts, (natya—theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing Dramatic plays (nataka), construction and performance of Theater, and Poetic works (kavya).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Veterinary Medicine (The study and treatment of Animals)

Source: Shodhganga: Portrayal of Animal Kingdom (Tiryaks) in Epics An Analytical study

Nimeṣa (निमेष) (lit. “one who has twinkling or winking speed of Garuḍa”) is a synonym (another name) for Garuḍa, according to scientific texts such as the Mṛgapakṣiśāstra (Mriga-pakshi-shastra) or “the ancient Indian science of animals and birds” by Hamsadeva, containing the varieties and descriptions of the animals and birds seen in the Sanskrit Epics such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata.

Unclassified Ayurveda definitions

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Nimeṣa (निमेष):—Closure of the eyelids, a moment, to flutter the eyelids.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Spanda Karikas (The Divine Creative Pulsation)

Nimeṣa (निमेष) (Cf. aunmukhya) refers to “retraction of the inclination towards manifestation” (i.e., “concealment of the essential nature of the Divine”), according to (commentaries on) the Spanda Kārikās section 1.—Both Rāmakaṇṭha and Utpala Bhaṭṭa warn that pralaya and udaya are not to be taken as corresponding to unmeṣa and nimeṣa exactly in the order in which they are given in the text but rather in a different order i.e. udaya with unmeṣa, and pralaya with nimeṣa:—“When there is unmeṣa i.e., aunmukhya or inclination towards manifestation, there is the udaya or emergence of the world. When there is nimeṣa or retraction of that inclination, there is submergence of the world”. Kṣemarāja takes pralaya and udaya both ways i.e. in a different order (bhinnakrama) as advocated by Rāmakaṇṭha and Utpalabhaṭṭa, and also in the order as they appear in the text. When taken in a different order, the meaning would be as given above. When taken in the order in which they appear in the text, the meaning would be as given below:—“When there is unmeṣa or revelation of the essential nature of the Divine, there is the pralaya or disappearance of the world. When there is nimeṣa or concealment of the essential nature of the Divine, there is the udaya or appearance of the world”. Both these interpretations are correct. In the first interpretation, the words unmeṣa and nimeṣa are construed with reference to Śakti of Śiva. In the second interpretation, they are construed with reference to the svarūpa or essential nature of Śiva.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Yoga (school of philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Nimesha in Yoga glossary
Source: ORA: Amanaska (king of all yogas): A Critical Edition and Annotated Translation by Jason Birch

Nīmeṣa (नीमेष) refers to the “closing of one’s eyes”, according to Kṣemarāja’s Svacchandoddyota on verse 2.89c.—Accordingly, “Wide-eyed means, his [point of] focus is inwards, his gaze outwards and he does not open or close his eyes (nīmeṣa-unmeṣa-varjita). It concerns the wide [eyes] of the supreme Śiva who has been described thus by our tradition”.

Yoga book cover
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Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nimesha in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

nimesa : (m.) winking; a wink.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Nimesa, (=nimisa, cp. Vedic nimesa) winking Miln. 194. (Page 367)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

nimēṣa (निमेष).—m (S) See nimiṣa.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nimeṣa (निमेष).—Twinkling of the eye, a moment &c.; see निमिष (nimiṣa); हरति निमेषात् कालः सर्वम् (harati nimeṣāt kālaḥ sarvam) Moha M.4.; अनिमेषेण चक्षुषा (animeṣeṇa cakṣuṣā) 'with a steadfast or fixed look'; R.2.19;3.43,61; Bri. Up.3.8.9.

Derivable forms: nimeṣaḥ (निमेषः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nimeṣa (निमेष).—m.

(-ṣaḥ) 1. Twinkling of the eye. 2. A momentary space of time, a twinkling of the eye considered as measure of time: see nimiṣa ni + miṣa bhāve ghañ .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nimeṣa (निमेष).—i. e. ni-miṣ + a, m. 1. Twinkling of the eye, [Nala] 5, 26. 2. A moment, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 36, 19. 3. A proper name, Mahābhārata 1, 1489.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nimeṣa (निमेष).—[masculine] = nimiṣa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nimeṣa (निमेष):—[=ni-meṣa] [from ni-miṣ] a m. shutting the eye, twinkling, winking, [Taittirīya-saṃhitā; Manu-smṛti; Yājñavalkya; Mahābhārata] etc. (also as a measure of time id est. a moment; ṣād iva, in a m°, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa] etc.; ṣaṃ nimeṣam, every m°, [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa]; as a disease, [Suśruta])

2) [v.s. ...] Name of a Yakṣa, [Mahābhārata]

3) [=ni-meṣa] b See under 1. ni-miṣ.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nimeṣa (निमेष):—[ni-meṣa] (ṣaḥ) 1. m. Twinkling of an eye, an instant, three lavas.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Nimeṣa (निमेष) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Ṇimesa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nimesha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nimesha in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Nimeṣa (निमेष) [Also spelled nimesh]:—(nm) see [nimiṣa].

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Ṇimesa (णिमेस) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Nimeṣa.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Nimēṣa (ನಿಮೇಷ):—

1) [noun] the act of blinking of eye-lids; twinkling; winking.

2) [noun] the act of closing (one’s) eyes.

3) [noun] a unit of time equal to the duration between two successive blinking of the eye-lids; a very short period of time; an instant; a moment.

4) [noun] the sixtieth part of an hour; a minute.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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