Nilotpala, aka: Nīlotpalā, Nīlotpala; 8 Definition(s)

Introduction

Nilotpala means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Nīlotpalā (नीलोत्पला):—One of the sixty-seven Mahauṣadhi, as per Rasaśāstra texts (rasa literature). These drugs are useful for processing mercury (rasa), such as the alchemical processes known as sūta-bandhana and māraṇa.

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra
Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Nilotpala in Purana glossary... « previous · [N] · next »

Nīlotpala (नीलोत्पल) refers to the lotus and represents flowers (puṣpa) once commonly used in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) as mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa verse 62 and 339. The lotus is also called by the names Kamala, Jalaja (verse 45), Padma, and Nīlanalina, Jātī (verse 429), Irā (verse 673-675ff.) and Kunda (verse 495).

Source: archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study

Nīlotpalā (नीलोत्पला).—A river of the Bhāratavarṣa.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 45. 100.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Nīlotpala (नीलोत्पल) refers to the “blue lotus” or “blue lily” and represents one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “accessories” of a detiy commonly seen depicted in Hindu iconography, defined according to texts dealing with śilpa (arts and crafs), known as śilpaśāstras.—The śilpa texts have classified the various accessories under the broad heading of āyudha or karuvi (implement), including even flowers, animals, and musical instruments. Flowers, such as the padma, (lotus), and the nīlotpala, (the blue lily) are to be generally seen in the hands of the images of goddesses especially in the hands of goddesses Lakṣmī and Bhūmīdevī.

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)
Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Nilotpala in Mahayana glossary... « previous · [N] · next »

Nīlotpala (नीलोत्पल) refers to the Blue Lotus flower according to the Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XIV).—Of all the terrestrial flowers, jasmine (mallikā) is the most beautiful; of all the aquatic flowers, blue lotus (nīlotpala) is the most beautiful.

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Nīlotpalā (नीलोत्पला) is the name of a Ḍākinī who, together with the Vīra (hero) named Nīlotpala forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Jñānacakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the jñānacakra refers to one of the three divisions of the saṃbhoga-puṭa (‘enjoyment layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs [viz., Nīlotpalā] and Vīras are white in color; the shapes of their faces are in accordance with their names; they have four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nilotpala in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [N] · next »

Nīlotpalā (नीलोत्पला).—n. of an apsaras: Kv 3.15.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 24 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Padma
Padma (पद्म) refers to one of the eight serpent king (nāgendra) of the Guṇacakra, according to ...
Jati
1) Jātī (जाती) is the name of a plant, the powders of which are used in ritualistic worship, ac...
Kunda
Kunda (कुन्द) refers to a “turner’s lathe”, and is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 19.54. See ...
Bana
Bāṇa (बाण) refers to an “arrow” and represents one of the items held in the right hand of Heruk...
Kamala
1) Kamala (कमल) is the name of a flower used in the worship of Śiva, according to the Śivapurāṇ...
Varsha
Varṣa (वर्ष).—mn. (-rṣaḥ-rṣaṃ) 1. Rain, raining. 2. Sprinkling, effusion. 3. Seminal effusion. ...
Mallika
1) Mallikā (मल्लिका) is the name of a flower used in the worship of Śiva, according to the Śiva...
Sumati
Sumati (सुमति).—m. (-tiḥ) 1. The fifth Jina or Jaina teacher of the present era. 2. One of the ...
Aghora
1) Aghora (अघोर) refers to one of the five faces of Sadāśiva that revealed the Āgamas (sacred t...
Utpala
Utpala (उत्पल) is the name of a flower used in the worship of Śiva, according to the Śivapurāṇa...
Mahaushadhi
Mahauṣadhī (महौषधी) is another name for Śvetakaṇṭakārī, a medicinal plant related to Kaṇṭakārī,...
Shanmukha
Ṣaṇmukha (or Sanmukhan) is the name of deity as found depicted in the Subramanya Swamy Temple (...
Gangeya
Gāṅgeya (गाङ्गेय) refers to (1) “gold”, (2) another name for Bhīṣma or Kārtikeya, and is mentio...
Jalaja
Jalaja (जलज).—mfn. (-jaḥ-jā-jaṃ) Water-born, aquatic. m. (-jaḥ) 1. A fish. 2. Any aquatic anima...
Mahavalli
Mahāvallī (महावल्ली).—f. (-llī) A large and handsome creeping plant, (Gærtnera racemosa.) E. ma...

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