Nilavarna, Nīlavarṇa, Nila-varna: 10 definitions

Introduction:

Nilavarna means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Nilavarna in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Nīlavarṇa (नीलवर्ण) refers to the “blue color”, according to the Kulakaulinīmata verse 3.82-88.—Accordingly, “[...] 4) Chedinī (the Piercing One) is blue [i.e., nīlavarṇa]. She holds a sword and club (kheṭaka). 5) Dakṣā (Skillful) is dark blue (śyāmā) and, auspicious, holds a snake and noose. 6) Strī is yellow and has a flag as (her) attribute. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Nīlavarṇā (नीलवर्णा) refers to “having a dark-blue color” and is used to describe Māmakī, according to the Guru Mandala Worship (maṇḍalārcana) ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “Locanī, having a golden color, arrow and shining appearance, Māmakī, having a dark-blue color (nīlavarṇā), water, grain and a bouquet, Pāṇḍarā, having a red color, and drawing a bow and arrow, Holy goddess Ārya Tārā, having a green color and blue lotus”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nilavarna in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nīlavarṇa (नीलवर्ण).—a. dark-blue, bluish.

-rṇam a radish.

Nīlavarṇa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms nīla and varṇa (वर्ण).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nīlavarṇa (नीलवर्ण).—mfn.

(-rṇaḥ-rṇī-rṇaṃ) Blue, of a blue colour. E. nīla, and varṇa colour.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nīlavarṇa (नीलवर्ण).—[adjective] blue-coloured.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nīlavarṇa (नीलवर्ण):—[=nīla-varṇa] [from nīla > nīl] mfn. blue-coloured, blue, [Hitopadeśa]

2) [v.s. ...] m. or n. a radish, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] m. Grewia Asiatica, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Nīlavarṇā (नीलवर्णा):—[=nīla-varṇā] [from nīla-varṇa > nīla > nīl] f. the indigo plant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nīlavarṇa (नीलवर्ण):—[nīla-varṇa] (rṇaḥ-rṇā-rṇaṃ) a. Blue.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nilavarna in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nilavarna in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Nīlavarṇa (ನೀಲವರ್ಣ):—[noun] = ನೀಲವಣ್ಣ [nilavanna].

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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