Nihshesha, Niḥśeṣa, Nishshesha, Niśśeṣa: 26 definitions

Introduction:

Nihshesha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Niḥśeṣa and Niśśeṣa can be transliterated into English as Nihsesa or Nihshesha or Nissesa or Nishshesha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

[«previous next»] — Nihshesha in Jyotisha glossary
Source: Google Books: Studies in the History of the Exact Sciences (Astronomy)

Niḥśeṣa (निःशेष) refers to a “range (of astral science)”, according to Hemavijaya Gaṇin’s Kathāratnākara (A.D. 1600).—Accordingly, “The Brāhmaṇa, who is especially well-versed in the whole range of astral science [i.e., niḥśeṣa-Jyotiḥśāstra-kuśala], wore a forehead mark made of saffron and rice-grains—{The round vessel is made of ten palas of copper. In the ghaṭikā [bowl] the height should be made of six aṅgulas. The diameter there should be made to the measure of twelve aṅgulas. The good cherish a water clock that holds sixty palas of water}—dropped the bowl, made fully according to the aforementioned prescriptions, in a basin filled with clean water at the time of the setting of the divine sun”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

Discover the meaning of nihshesha or nihsesa in the context of Jyotisha from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Nihshesha in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Niḥśeṣa (निःशेष) (cf. Aśeṣa) refers to “all things”, according to the Khacakrapañcakastotra (“hymn to the five wheels of emptiness”) by Jñānanetra, the founder of the Kashmiri Kālīkrama.—Accordingly, “I bow to the Great Reality, the venerable (goddess) Maṅgalā, she who is the mother of all things, the energy of Śiva, the awesome power of consciousness. (I praise her) the great wave of the Great Reality filled with all things [i.e., niḥśeṣa-pūrita], (she who is) the light of the Inexplicable, the Sun, Moon and the Fire of (universal) destruction”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of nihshesha or nihsesa in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

Yoga (school of philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Nihshesha in Yoga glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (yoga)

Niḥśeṣa (निःशेष) refers to “everything”, according to the 17th-century Yogacintāmaṇi by Śivānandasarasvatī, a text dealing with Haṭhayoga consisting of 3423 verses.—Accordingly, “Having bowed to Śrīvyāsa, the ascetic Śaṅkara, the teacher of the world, [my] teacher Śrīrāmacandra, whose lotus feet are intense bliss, and all of the gods of yogins, the ascetic Śivānanda has written clearly the great Yogacintāmaṇi, which had fallen into an ocean of various texts and has the power to explain everything (niḥśeṣa-artha-samarthaka)”.

Source: ORA: Amanaska (king of all yogas): A Critical Edition and Annotated Translation by Jason Birch

Niḥśeṣa (निःशेष) refers to “completely”, according to the Haṭhapradīpikā of Svātmārāma: an influential 15th-century Sanskrit manual on Hatha-Yoga dealing with techniques to channel one’s vital energy.—Accordingly, “For the Yogin whose awakening of Kuṇḍalinī has occurred and whose actions have been completely (niḥśeṣa) renounced, the natural [state of Samādhi] arises spontaneously”.

Yoga book cover
context information

Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

Discover the meaning of nihshesha or nihsesa in the context of Yoga from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Nihshesha in Shaivism glossary
Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Niḥśeṣa (निःशेष) refers to the “complete (accomplishing)”, according to the Netratantroddyota commentary on the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 4.5cd-6, while describing the purification process of the initiand]—“[...] After that comes bhoga, which is the experiencing of pleasure, pain, and delusion. The process of action (laya) [is to] of melt away any trace of fruition, which remains for a short period of time even though the bhoga has ceased. Then [comes] penance (niṣkṛti), which means the complete accomplishing (niḥśeṣa-saṃpatti) of all bhoga that pertains to birth, life, and experiences. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of nihshesha or nihsesa in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Nihshesha in Ayurveda glossary

Toxicology (Study and Treatment of poison)

Source: Shodhganga: Kasyapa Samhita—Text on Visha Chikitsa

Niḥśeṣa (निःशेष) refers to “totally (decimating plant-poison)”, according to the Kāśyapa Saṃhitā: an ancient Sanskrit text from the Pāñcarātra tradition dealing with both Tantra and Viṣacikitsā—an important topic from Āyurveda which deals with the study of Toxicology (Viṣavidyā or Sarpavidyā).—The 12h adhyāya of the Kāśyapasaṃhita also deals with the mantras for curing immobile or plant poison (sthāvara-viṣa) as well as antidotes made of medicines that quell the same.—Accordingly, “A decoction of Kośātakī, Agni, cinnamon, Sūryavallī, Amṛta, Abhayā, Śleṣmātaka, Śirīṣa, Karṇikā, Kāśmarī, two kinds of Niṣā, Punarnāvā Bṛhatī and Kaṇṭhakārī, two varieties of Sārivā and Trikaṭu cooled and mixed with ghee and honey is useful in totally (niḥśeṣa) decimating plant-poison”.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Discover the meaning of nihshesha or nihsesa in the context of Ayurveda from relevant books on Exotic India

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Niḥśeṣa (निःशेष) refers to the “enitere (abandonment)” (of hatred) [i.e., niḥśeṣa-dveṣa rahitasya mahāsukhasya], according to the Guru Mandala Worship (maṇḍalārcana) ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “To reach the happiness, in the heart of all beings, Of the whole soul, of the highest dharma family ruler, Of the abandonment of hatred entirely (niḥśeṣa-dveṣa), of great bliss, That happiness, be to you, the farthest consecration”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

Discover the meaning of nihshesha or nihsesa in the context of Tibetan Buddhism from relevant books on Exotic India

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Nihshesha in Jainism glossary
Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Niḥśeṣa (निःशेष) refers to a “completely (worthless)”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Having taken hold of this body in this life, suffering is endured by you. Hence, that [body] is certainly a completely worthless abode (niḥśeṣa-anartha-mandira). Whatever difficulties arise from life, they are each endured here by the embodied soul, only having taken hold of the body powerfully”.

Synonyms: Sarva.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of nihshesha or nihsesa in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nihshesha in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

nissesa : (adj.) entire; whole.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Nissesa, (adj.) (nis+sesa) whole, entire; nt. Acc. as adv. nissesaṃ entirely, completely Nd2 533. (Page 375)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of nihshesha or nihsesa in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nihshesha in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

niśśēṣa (निश्शेष).—a (S) That is without remainder; complete, whole, entire. 2 as ad Wholly, utterly, altogether, quite.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

niḥśēṣa (निःशेष).—a See niśśēṣa.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

niśśēṣa (निश्शेष).—a That is without remainder; complete, whole. ad Wholly, alto- gether, quite.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of nihshesha or nihsesa in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nihshesha in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Niḥśeṣa (निःशेष).—a. [nirgataḥ śeṣo yasya] Whole, complete, entire; निःशेषविश्राणितकोशजातम् (niḥśeṣaviśrāṇitakośajātam) R.5.1.

-ṣam, -ṣeṇa ind. Wholly, completely, totally, entirely.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niḥśeṣa (निःशेष).—mfn.

(-ṣaḥ-ṣā-ṣaṃ) Complete, entire. E. niḥ for nir negative, and śeṣa remainder; also niśśeṣa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niḥśeṣa (निःशेष).—adj., f. ṣā, 1. without leaving a residue, without sparing anybody or anything, completely destroyed, [Pañcatantra] iii. [distich] 256; Mahābhārata 2, 1531. 2. all, whole, [Pañcatantra] i. [distich] 21. ºṣam, ṣa + tas, adv. completely, [Kathāsaritsāgara, (ed. Brockhaus.)] 24, 83.

Niḥśeṣa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms nis and śeṣa (शेष).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niḥśeṣa (निःशेष).—[adjective] having no remainder, whole, entire; [accusative] [with] kṛ = niśeṣay (q.v.). °—, [instrumental] & [adverb] in tas entirely, completely. — Cf. aśeṣa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Niḥśeṣa (निःशेष):—[=niḥ-śeṣa] [from niḥ] mf(ā)n. without remainder, (either =) finished, passed away (kalpa), [Harivaṃśa] (ṣaṃkṛ to destroy completely, [Mahābhārata])

2) [v.s. ...] (or =) complete, whole, entire, all, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] at beg. of [compound] (= ṣam ind., or ṣeṇa ind.) totally, completely

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niḥśeṣa (निःशेष):—[niḥ-śeṣa] (ṣaḥ-ṣā-ṣaṃ) a. Complete, entire.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Niḥśeṣa (निःशेष) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Ṇissesa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nihshesha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of nihshesha or nihsesa in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Prakrit-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nihshesha in Prakrit glossary
Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Ṇissesa (णिस्सेस) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Niḥśeṣa.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

Discover the meaning of nihshesha or nihsesa in the context of Prakrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nihshesha in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Niḥśēṣa (ನಿಃಶೇಷ):—[adjective] that is having or has left, no remainder.

--- OR ---

Niḥśēṣa (ನಿಃಶೇಷ):—

1) [noun] the condition of (something) leaving no remainder.

2) [noun] a complete destruction.

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Niśśēṣa (ನಿಶ್ಶೇಷ):—

1) [adjective] suppressing or subsiding (another).

2) [adjective] not leaving any remainder (as when being divided by another quantity); remainderless.

3) [adjective] not leaving any mark or trace (as when being destroyed).

--- OR ---

Niśśēṣa (ನಿಶ್ಶೇಷ):—

1) [noun] that which is divided completely (without leaving a remainder).

2) [noun] a complete destruction (without leaving a trace).

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

Discover the meaning of nihshesha or nihsesa in the context of Kannada from relevant books on Exotic India

Nepali dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nihshesha in Nepali glossary
Source: unoes: Nepali-English Dictionary

Niśśeṣa (निश्शेष):—adj. 1. without remainder; 2. vanished; 3. entire; complete;

context information

Nepali is the primary language of the Nepalese people counting almost 20 million native speakers. The country of Nepal is situated in the Himalaya mountain range to the north of India.

Discover the meaning of nihshesha or nihsesa in the context of Nepali from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Let's grow together!

I humbly request your help to keep doing what I do best: provide the world with unbiased sources, definitions and images. Your donation direclty influences the quality and quantity of knowledge, wisdom and spiritual insight the world is exposed to.

Let's make the world a better place together!

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: