Nihara, Nīhāra, Nihāra: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Nihara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Nihar.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Nīhāra (नीहार) refers to “snowfall”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.22 (“Description of Pārvatī’s penance”).—Accordingly, after Menā spoke to Pārvatī: “[...] In the summer she kept a perpetually blazing fire all round and remaining within continued muttering the mantra. In the rainy season she continuously remained sitting on the bare ground on the rock and got herself drenched by the downpour of rain. During the winter, with great devotion she remained in water throughout. During snowfall [i.e., nīhāra] and in the nights too she performed her penance observing fast”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Nīhāra (नीहार).—The place where elephants of the four quarters throw out the waters in different ways.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 22. 52.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Nīhāra (नीहार) refers to “falling of snow”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 5), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “Lunar and solar eclipses terminate in ten ways [...] These terminations of the lunar eclipse apply to those of the solar eclipse, the only difference being that where the east has been referred to in the former, it must be taken to mean the west in the latter. If, within seven days from the termination of an eclipse there should occur a dust storm, mankind will suffer from starvation; if there should occur a fall of snow [i.e., nīhāra] there will be fear from disease; if there should occur an earthquake, the chief rulers will die. [...]”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

nīhāra : (m.) 1. ejection; 2. carrying out; 3. the way; manner.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Nīhāra, (cp. Sk. nirhāra) way, manner Vin. I, 13; J. I, 127; DhA. IV, 7. At Vin. I, 13 also in nīhāra-bhatta (=nīhāraka). (Page 376)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nihāra (निहार).—See नीहार (nīhāra).

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Nīhāra (नीहार).—[ni-hṛ karmaṇi ghañ dīrghaḥ]

1) Fog, mist; नीहारमग्नो दिनपूर्वभागः (nīhāramagno dinapūrvabhāgaḥ) R.7.6; Y.1.15; Ms.4.113; नीहारधूमार्कानला- निलानाम् (nīhāradhūmārkānalā- nilānām) Yogagrantha.

2) Hoar-frost, heavy dew.

3) Evacuation.

Derivable forms: nīhāraḥ (नीहारः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nīhāra (नीहार).—m.

(-raḥ) 1. Frost, hoar-frost. 2. Heavy dew. 3. Evacuation. E. ni before, hṛ to steal or take, aff. karmaṇi ghañ .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nīhāra (नीहार).—m. Fog, [Hiḍimbavadha] 4, 40.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nīhāra (नीहार).—[masculine] ([neuter]) fog, mist (also [plural]).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nihāra (निहार):—[=ni-hāra] a etc. See ni-√hṛ.

2) [=ni-hāra] [from ni-hṛ] b m. excrement, [Viṣṇu-smṛti, viṣṇu-sūtra, vaiṣṇava-dharma-śāstra] (cf. nir-h)

3) [v.s. ...] mist, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] (cf. nī-h under 5. ).

4) Nīhāra (नीहार):—[=nī-hāra] [from ] m. (once n.) mist, fog, hoar-frost, heavy dew, [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc. (cf. ni-hāra under ni-hṛ)

5) [v.s. ...] evacuation (cf. nir-h)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nihāra (निहार):—[ni-hāra] (raḥ) 1. m. Frost.

2) Nīhāra (नीहार):—[nī-hāra] (raḥ) 1. m. Frost; hoar frost.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Nihāra (निहार) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Ṇihāra, Ṇīhāra.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nihara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Nīhāra (नीहार) [Also spelled nihar]:—(nm) mist, fog; —[jala] dew.

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Ṇihara (णिहर) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Nihṛ.

2) Ṇihara (णिहर) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Ākrand.

3) Ṇihara (णिहर) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Niḥsṛ.

4) Ṇihāra (णिहार) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Nihāra.

5) Ṇīhara (णीहर) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Niḥsṛ.

6) Ṇīhara (णीहर) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Ākrand.

7) Ṇīhara (णीहर) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Nirhrad.

8) Ṇīhara (णीहर) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Niḥsāra.

9) Ṇīhara (णीहर) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Nirhṛ.

10) Ṇīhāra (णीहार) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Nīhāra.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Nihāra (ನಿಹಾರ):—[noun] a loud sound; noise.

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Nihāra (ನಿಹಾರ):—

1) [noun] a large mass of water vapour condensed to fine particles, at or just above the earth’s surface; thick, obscuring mist; fog.

2) [noun] murkiness or obscurity caused by smoke, mist, etc.

3) [noun] (fig.) the condition or quality of being ignorant; lack of knowledge.

4) [noun] waste matter expelled from the bowels; faeces.

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Nīhāra (ನೀಹಾರ):—

1) [noun] a large mass of water vapour condensed to fine particles, at or just above the earth’s surface; thick, obscuring mist; fog.

2) [noun] a discharging of waste matters from the bowels.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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