Navasara, aka: Navasāra, Nava-sara, Navan-sara; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Navasara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Navasāra (नवसार, “ammonium chloride”):—Sanskrit name for one of the drugs belonging to the Sādhāraṇarasa group, according to the Rasaprakāśasudhākara: a 13th century Sanskrit book on Indian alchemy, or, Rasaśāstra. Navasāra is useful when melting metals. It also serves as an effective agent when treating mercury. Ammonium chloride is an acidic compound consisting of the salt of ammonia and hydrogen choloride.

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Navasāra (नवसार) or Narasāra refers to “Sal-ammoniac”. (see Bhudeb Mookerji and his Rasajalanidhi)

Source: archive.org: Rasa-Jala-Nidhi: Or Ocean of indian chemistry and alchemy

Navasāra (ammonium chloride).—Navasāra is also called Culhikālavaṇa. It is also known as Lohadrāvaṇaka (helps in the melting of metals) and Rasajāraṇaka (helps in the Jāraṇa-saṃskāra of mercury)

It stimulates agni (digestive fire), destroys gulma and plīharoga, acts as māṃsajāraṇa (help in the digestion of flash and also in food digestion).

Source: Indian Journal of History of Science: Rasaprakāśa-sudhākara, chapter 6
Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Navasara in Marathi glossary... « previous · [N] · next »

navasara (नवसर).—a Recent: also as ad recently. See navathara.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

navasara (नवसर).—a See navathara.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Navasara in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [N] · next »

Navasāra (नवसार).—a kind of Āyurvedic decoction; नवसारो भवेच्छुद्धश्चूर्णतोयैर्विपाचितः । दोलायन्त्रेण यत्नेन भिषग्भिर्योगसिद्धये (navasāro bhavecchuddhaścūrṇatoyairvipācitaḥ | dolāyantreṇa yatnena bhiṣagbhiryogasiddhaye) || Vaidyachandrikā.

Derivable forms: navasāraḥ (नवसारः).

Navasāra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms nava and sāra (सार).

--- OR ---

Navasara (नवसर).—a kind of ornament consisting of nine pearls.

Derivable forms: navasaraḥ (नवसरः), navasaram (नवसरम्).

Navasara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms navan and sara (सर).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 924 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Sara
Sāra (सार) refers to “essence”, symbolically represented by ashes (bhasma) used in ceremonies a...
Nava
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Sāradā.—name of the alphabet which developed out of late Brāhmī and was prevalent in the Kashmi...
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Śarabhaṅga (शरभङ्ग).—(= Pali Sara°; known also in Sanskrit, Mahābhārata, where however the stor...
Navanita
Nāvanīta (नावनीत).—(-tī f.)1) Coming from butter.2) Mild, soft, gentle; नावनीतं हि हृदयं विप्रा...
Saraja
Śaraja (शरज).—n. (-jaṃ) Butter made from milk one day old. E. śara cream, ja born.--- OR --- Sa...
Navagraha
Navagraha (नवग्रह) refers to the “nine planetary divinities”, images of which are found scatter...
Navanga
Navāṅga (नवाङ्ग) refers the nine classifications of Buddhist scriptures, according to the 2nd c...
Sarasana
Śarāsana (शरासन).—See under Citraśarāsana.
Navaratri
Navarātri.—(EI 11, 25; CII 4), the festival of Durgā; Āśvina-sudi 1 to 9. Note: navarātri is de...
Punarnava
Punarnava (पुनर्नव).—m. (-vaḥ) A finger-nail. f. (-vā) Hog weed. (Boerhavia diffusa alata.) E. ...
Navaratna
Nava-ratna.—(BL), the nine gems at Vikramāditya's court. Note: nava-ratna is defined in the “In...
Navaratra
Navaratra (नवरत्र).—n. (-traṃ) 1. Nine precious gems, or a pearl, ruby, topaz, diamond, emerald...

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