Nata, aka: Ñāta, Naṭa, Natā; 14 Definition(s)

Introduction

Nata means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

1) Naṭa (नट) refers to an “actor” of a dramatic play (nāṭya), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 35. Accordingly, “an actor (naṭa) should be lively (lit. bright), possessed of a good physique, acquainted with theatrical accessories and their uses, possessed of intelligence, conversant with the rules of the theoretical practice, and expert in his own work”. According to verse 35.100, “definition of an actor (naṭa).—one who can apply the music of four kinds of instrument, and produce a play according to the meaning of the Śāstra as well as his own reasoning, is called an actor (naṭa)”.

2a) Natā (नता, “inclined”) refers to a specific gesture (āṅgika) made with the nose (nāsā), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. These gestures form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya). (Instructions): “lobes cling for a while to the base”. (Uses): “in slight weeping at intervals”.

2b) Natā (नता, “bent”) refers to a specific gesture (āṅgika) made with the neck (grīvā), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. These ‘gestures of the neck (grīvā)’ should follow the gestures made with the head (śiras). These gestures form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya). ( Instructions): “neck with face bent down”. (Uses): “in wearing (lit. binding) ornaments, putting one’s arms round (lit. taking) somebody’s neck”.

3a) Nata (नत, “bent”) refers to a specific gesture (āṅgika) made with the sides (pārśva), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 10. The sides are one of the six major limbs (aṅga) used to perform certain gestures (āṅgika). These gestures form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya). (Instructions): “the waist slightly bent, one side slightly bent, one shoulder drawn away slightly”. (Uses): “in approaching any body”.

3b) Nata (नत, “bent”) also refers to a specific gesture (āṅgika) made with the shank (jaṅghā), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 10. These gestures form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya). (Instructions): “the knee bent”. (Uses): “in assuming sthāna (standing) and āsana (sitting) postures”.

3c) Nata (नत) also refers to a type of lying-down posture (śayana); it is a Sanskrit technical term defined in the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 12. (Instructions): “lying down with the legs (lit. shanks) slightly stretched and the two hands loosely resting is called the nata posture. It is to be used in laziness, fatigue and distress”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

The Dancer or Actor (naṭa).—Wise men say the Dancer (or actor) should be handsome, of sweet speech, learned, capable, eloquent, of good birth, learned in the scriptures (śāstras) of art and science, of sweet voice, versed in song, instrumental music, and dancing, self-confident, and of ready wit.

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)
Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Nata (नत).—Cerebralized; changed into ण् (). The change of the consonant न् (n) into ण् () is called नति (nati) in the old Pratisakhya works; cf. स्पर्शे वोष्मणि चानते (sparśe voṣmaṇi cānate) R. Pr. IV. 11.

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar
context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Naṭa (नट, “actors”) refers to one of the sub-castes that once existed in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) as mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa.

Source: archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Nirukta (Sanskrit etymology)

Naṭa (नट, “actor”).—Meaning of the root naṭ is ‘to act’ (lit. acts) and hence, as he acts (naṭayati) again and again the stories of men with Sentiments, States and Temperament, he is called (lit. he becomes) a Naṭa (actor).

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭyaśāstra (nirukta)
context information

Nirukta (निरुक्त) or “etymology” refers to the linguistic analysis of the Sanskrit language. This branch studies the interpretation of common and ancient words and explains them in their proper context. Nirukta is one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Nata (नत) or Mīlita refers to a “half-closed/half-opnened bud” (of a flower), as mentioned in a list of ten synonyms, according to the second chapter (dharaṇyādi-varga) of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu (an Ayurvedic encyclopedia). The Dharaṇyādi-varga covers the lands, soil, mountains, jungles and vegetation’s relations between trees [viz., Nata] and plants and substances, with their various kinds.

Source: Wisdom Library: Raj Nighantu
Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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India history and geogprahy

Naṭa.—(EI 31), a dancer; sometimes mentioned in the list of officials probably indicating ‘the chief dancer’. Note: naṭa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

nata : (pp. of namati) bent; stooped; inclined. || natā (pp. of namati), bent; bowed down. naṭa (m.), dancer; actor.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Nata, (Sk. nata, pp. of namati, q. v. ) bent (on) S. I, 186 (a°); Sn. 1143; Nd2 327. (Page 345)

— or —

Naṭa, (Sk. naṭa dial. ṭ, cp. Prk. naḍa, of nṛt, see naccati) a dancer, player, mimic, actor Vin. IV, 285; S. IV, 306 sq.; DhA. IV, 60 (°dhītā), 65 (°karaka), 224 (°kīḷā); Miln. 359 (°naccaka); Sdhp. 380.—Cp. naṭaka & nāṭaka. (Page 345)

— or —

Ñāta, (pp. of jānāti=Gr. gnwtόs, Lat. (g)notus; ajñāta (P. aññāta) = a)/gnwtos=ignotus) known, well-known; experienced, brought to knowledge, realized. In Nd2 s. v. constantly expl. by tulita tirita vibhūta vibhāvita which series is also used as expln. of diṭṭha & vidita A. V, 195; J. I, 266; Sn. 343 (+yasassin); Miln. 21 (id.).—aññāta not known, unknown Vin. I, 209; M. I, 430; S. II, 281; DhA. I, 208. (Page 288)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

naṭa (नट).—m (S) A class or caste who employ themselves in rope-dancing, tumbling, acting &c.; a tumbler, a mime, a buffoon, a player, a masker. Hence Rogue, scamp, cheat, vagabond. 2 A Rag or musical mode.

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nata (नत).—S Bent, bowed, reclining.

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nata (नत).—n or natabhāga m or natāṃśa m S In astronomy. Zenith-distance.

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nāṭa (नाट).—n A play with cowries: also the cowries (usually five): also the cross-lines drawn: also the board on which the game is played. 2 Evil fortune; unpropitiousness or unluckiness; some marring, blasting, mischievous power (conceived as the author of a hinderance or an injury). v lāga, lāva. Ex. āja kārya vhāyācēṃ parantu āja kāya nāṭa lāgalēṃ tēṃ samajēnā. nāṭa bhājaṇēṃ or jāḷaṇēṃ (To burn the ill-luck.) To destroy or remove inauspiciousness or unpropitiousness: i. e. to make bōhaṇī or the first morningsale at all costs; or to do anything daringly and desperately.

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nāṭa (नाट).—a Bankrupt, broken, done up, incapable of paying; or scampish, knavish, indisposed to pay--a debtor. 2 Inauspicious, unpropitious, untoward, of obstructive or blasting influence--a time, an aspect &c.

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nāṭa (नाट).—ad Clean lost or perished; gone beyond all trace or vestige; utterly extinct or obliterated; absconded or non inventus. 2 Out of one's depth; in a state of bewilderment, inextricableness, helplessness &c. 3 Out to sea; off from the land. Ex. galabatācī nāḷa nāṭa lāva. nāṭa karaṇēṃ To walk off with; to make away with; to purloin. nāṭa jāṇēṃ or yēṇēṃ To fail or be wanting; to omit to render the service or aid promised or expected: also to hold back decliningly or refusingly; as hā dōhō rupayāṃlā nāṭa gēlā.

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nāṭā (नाटा) [or ठा, ṭhā].—a (nāṭa) Vile, bad, naughty, good for nothing. Pr. sāṭhī āṇi buddhi nāṭhī. The word is little used or known.

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nāta (नात) [or नातीण, nātīṇa].—f A granddaughter (whether in the male or female line).

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

naṭa (नट).—m An actor; A rope-dancer, a buffoon. Rogue. A Rag or musical mode.

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nata (नत).—pp Bent, bowed. Zenith-distance.

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nāṭa (नाट).—n A play with cowries; the cowries (usually five); the cross-lines drawn; the board on which the game is play- ed. Evil fortune; unpropitiousness or unluckiness. nāṭa bhājaṇēṃ or jāḷaṇēṃ (To burn the ill-luck.) To destroy or remove inauspiciousness or unpropi- tiousness; i. e. to make bōhaṇī or the first morning sale at all costs; or to do any thing daringly and despera- tely.

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nāṭa (नाट).—a Bankrupt, done up; knavish. In auspicious, unpropitious.

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nāṭa (नाट).—ad Clean lost or perished; gone beyond all trace or vestige. Out of one's depth; in a state of bewilder- ment. Out to sea; off from the land Ex. galabatācī nāḷa nāṭa lāva. nāṭa karaṇēṃ To walk off with; to purloin. nāṭa jāṇēṃ or yēṇēṃ To fail or be wanting.

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nāṭā (नाटा) [or ṭhā, or ठा].—a Vile, naughty. Pr. sāṭhī āṇi buddhi nāṭhī

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nāta (नात) [or nātīṇa, or नातीण].—f A grand-daughter (whether in the male or female line).

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Naṭa (नट).—[naṭ-ac]

1) A dancer; न नटा न विटा न गायकाः (na naṭā na viṭā na gāyakāḥ) Bh.3.27.

2) An actor; कुर्वन्नयं प्रहसनस्य नटः कृतोऽसि (kurvannayaṃ prahasanasya naṭaḥ kṛto'si) Bh. 3.126,112; नटवद् व्यवतिष्ठते लिङ्गम् (naṭavad vyavatiṣṭhate liṅgam) Sāṅ. K.42.

3) The son of a degraded Kṣatriya; Ms.1.22.

4) The Aśoka tree.

5) A kind of reed.

Derivable forms: naṭaḥ (नटः).

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Nata (नत).—p. p. [nam-kta]

1) Bent, bowed, stooping, inclined.

2) Sunk, depressed.

3) Crooked, curved.

4) Bowing to, saluting; सुविस्मितं कृत्यमजं नतोऽस्मि तम् (suvismitaṃ kṛtyamajaṃ nato'smi tam) Bhāg.5.18.4.

-tam 1 The distance of any planet from the meridian.

2) The zenith distance at a meridian transit.

3) Inclination.

4) The buttocks (cf. natataṭe); L. D. B.

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Nāṭa (नाट).—[naṭ-ghañ]

1) Dancing, acting.

2) Name of the Karnātaka country.

Derivable forms: nāṭaḥ (नाटः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Naṭa (नट).—n. of a śreṣṭhin: Divy 349.11; MSV i.3.17.

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Naṭā (नटा).—[, see Naṭṭā.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 114 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Kunata
Kunaṭa (कुनट).—m. (-ṭaḥ) A sort of trumpet flower. f. (-ṭī) 1. Red arsenic. 2. Coriander. E. ku...
Natavadi
Nātavāḍi is the name of an ancient district (country) mentioned in the  “Māṅgallu grant of...
Natamsha
Natāṃśa (नतांश).—n. (-rśaṃ) Zenith distance, (in Astronomy.) E. nata, and aṃśa a degree.
Natanga
Natāṅga (नताङ्ग).—mfn. (-ṅgaḥ-ṅgī-ṅgaṃ) Bent, curved, bowed, stooping. f. (-ṅgī A woman E. nata...
Ekanata
Ekanaṭa (एकनट).—m. (-ṭaḥ) The principal actor in a drama, the manager. E. eka chief, and naṭa a...
Mahanata
Mahānaṭa (महानट).—m. (-ṭaḥ) Siva. E. mahā great, and naṭa a dancer.
Natanasika
Natanāsika (नतनासिक).—mfn. (-kaḥ-kā-kaṃ) Flat-nosed. E. nata bowed, and nāsika the nose.
Natabhaga
Natabhāga (नतभाग).—m. (-gaḥ) (In Astronomy,) Zenith distance. E. nata and bhāga a part.
Nateshvara
Naṭeśvara (नटेश्वर).—m. (-raḥ) A name of Siva, E. naṭa a dancer, and īśvara a deity, the god of...
Natakala
Natakāla (नतकाल).—Hour-angle measured in time. Note: Nata-kāla is a Sanskrit technical term use...
Natasamjnaka
Naṭasaṃjñaka (नटसंज्ञक).—m. (-kaḥ) 1. Yellow orpiment, 2. An actor, a dancer, &c. E. naṭa a...
Trinata
Tṛṇatā (तृणता).—f.1) The quality of a straw, worthlessness.2) A bow; तृणता तृणत्वे कार्मुकेऽपि ...
Nataranga
Naṭaraṅga (नटरङ्ग).—m., lit. actor-stage, as symbol of deceptive or illusory character: °gaḥ Mv...
Natajya
Natajyā (नतज्या).—R sine of zenith distance. Note: Natajyā is a Sanskrit technical term used in...
Natabhagajya
Natabhāgajyā (नतभागज्या).—:R sine of zenith distance. Note: Nata-bhāgajyā is a Sanskrit technic...

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