Nari, Nārī, Nāri: 23 definitions

Introduction:

Nari means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Nārī (नारी) refers to “women”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.9.—Accordingly, as Menā said to Himācala (Himavat):—“As but is natural to women [i.e., nārī-svabhāvata], the words of the sage have not been understood by me well. (I think it is better) that you perform the marriage of our daughter with a handsome bridegroom. Let the bridegroom of Pārvatī be born of a good family endowed with good characteristic signs. In every respect that marriage will yield an unprecedented happiness. Obeisance to you. Do everything necessary to make our daughter, as beloved to us as our own lives, very happy and delighted after being united with a good bridegroom”.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Nārī (नारी).—A daughter of Meru. She and her sisters were married by the following sons of Agnīdhra, i.e. Nābhi, Kimpuruṣa, Hari, Ilāvṛta, Ramyaka, Hiraṇmaya, Kuru, Bhadrāśva and Ketumāla. (Bhāgavata, 5th Skandha).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Nārī (नारी).—A daughter of Meru and queen of Kuru.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 2. 23.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

One of the palaces occupied by Tissa Buddha in his last lay life. Bu.xviii.17; BuA (188) calls it Narisa.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Nārī (नारी) is the name of a Ḍākinī who, together with the Vīra (hero) named Nāracakravartin forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Kāyacakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the kāyacakra refers to one of the three divisions of the nirmāṇa-puṭa (emanation layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs [viz., Nārī] and Vīras are body-word-mind-color (mixture of white, red, and black); they each have one face and four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Nārī (नारी) is the name of a river mentioned as flowing through Ramyaka together with the Narakāntā river. Ramyaka is one of the seven regions (kṣetra) of Jambūdvīpa according to Jaina cosmology. Jambūdvīpa sits at the centre of madhyaloka (‘middle world’) is the most important of all continents and it is here where human beings reside.

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 3: The Lower and middle worlds

Nārī (नारी) is the name of a river that, coupled with the Narakāntā river, separates the Ramyaka region. Ramyaka refers to one of the regions of Jambūdvīpa: the first continent of the Madhya-loka (middle-word), according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 3.10. The Nārī river flows eastwards. The Nārī and Narakāntā rivers and have 56000 tributaries.

Jambūdvīpa (where flows the Nārī river) is in the centre of all continents and oceans; all continents and oceans are concentric circles with Jambūdvīpa in the centre. Like the navel is in the centre of the body, Jambūdvīpa is in the centre of all continents and oceans. Sumeru Mount is in the centre of Jambūdvīpa. It is also called Mount Sudarśana.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

nārī : (f.) a woman.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Nārī, (f.) (Sk. nārī to nara man, orig. “the one belonging to the man”) woman, wife, female Sn. 301, 836; Dh. 284; J. I, 60; III, 395; IV, 396 (°gaṇa); Vv 61, 4416; Pv. I, 91 (=itthi PvA. 44). pl. nariyo (Sn. 299, 304, 703), & nāriyo (Sn. 703 v. l. BB; Pv. II, 952). combined with nara as naranārī, male & female (angels), e.g. Vv 538; Pv. II, 112 (see nara). (Page 350)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

narī (नरी).—f ( H) Goatskin dressed (for shoes &c.)

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narī (नरी).—f S A woman.

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nārī (नारी).—f (S) A woman or female.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

narī (नरी).—f Goatskin dressed (for shoes &c.)

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narī (नरी).—f A woman.

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nārī (नारी).—f A woman or female.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Narī (नरी).—A woman; नम्या नरीभिरमरीव हि सा विरेजे (namyā narībhiramarīva hi sā vireje) Bv.3.16.

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Nārī (नारी).—[nṝ-nara-vā jātau ṅīṣ ni°]

1) A woman; अर्थतः पुरुषो नारी या नारी सार्थतः पुमान् (arthataḥ puruṣo nārī yā nārī sārthataḥ pumān) Mk.3.27.

2) Any female or feminine object.

3) Sacrifice.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nārī (नारी).—f. (-rī) 1. A woman in general, a female. 2. A species of the Madhya metre. E. nara a man, and ṅīp affs. or nṛ + nara + vā jātau ṅīṣ nipātane .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nārī (नारी).—see nāra.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nāri (नारि).—[feminine] = nārī.

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Nārī (नारी).—v. nāra.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Narī (नरी):—[from nara] a f. a woman (= nārī), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [from nara] b in [compound] for ra.

3) Nārī (नारी):—[from nāra] a f. See nārī

4) Nāri (नारि):—[from nāra] f. = nārī below.

5) Nārī (नारी):—[from nāra] b f. (of ra q.v.) a woman, a wife (in older language also nāri), [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc.

6) [v.s. ...] a female or any object regarded as feminine, [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā; Taittirīya-āraṇyaka]

7) [v.s. ...] sacrifice, [Naighaṇṭuka, commented on by Yāska]

8) [v.s. ...] Name of a daughter of Meru, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

9) [v.s. ...] of 2 kinds of metre, [Colebrooke]

10) c f. See above.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nārī (नारी):—(rī) 3. f. A woman in general.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Nārī (नारी) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Ṇārī.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nari in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Nārī (नारी):—(nf) a woman; (a) female; -[upāsanā] geneolatory; —[dveṣa] misogymy.

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Ṇārī (णारी) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Nārī.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Nari (ನರಿ):—

1) [noun] the wild dog Canis aureus, (smaller than the wolf), which often hunt prey in pack at night and eat carrion and cretin plants, believed to be sly; jackal.

2) [noun] the large, fierce Asian cat, Panthera tigris, having a tawny coat striped with black; a tiger.

3) [noun] a subtly deceitful, cunning person.

4) [noun] ನರಿಕೂಗು ಗಗನ ಮುಟ್ಟೀತೆ [narikugu gagana muttite]? nari kūgu gagana muṭṭīte? (prov.) the voice of poor and underprivileged, is never heard in the society; ನರಿಯ ಬುದ್ಧಿ [nariya buddhi] nariya buddhi craftiness; slyness; cunningness; ನರಿ ಮುಖ ನೋಡಿರು [nari mukha nodiru] nari mukha nōḍiru (fig.) to be very fortunate.

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Nāri (ನಾರಿ):—

1) [noun] the string of a bow.

2) [noun] the fibrous web at the bottom of a coconut leaf-stalk.

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Nāri (ನಾರಿ):—

1) [noun] an adult human being; a woman.

2) [noun] ಒಲಿದರೆ ನಾರಿ, ಮುನಿದರೆ ಮಾರಿ [olidare nari, munidare mari] olidare nāri, munidare māri she who bestows favour when friendly, can annihilate when enraged.

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Nāri (ನಾರಿ):—[noun] he who is foe-less; a man having no enemy.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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