Narayaniya, Nārāyaṇīya: 6 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Narayaniya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Narayaniya in Purana glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Art and Iconography of and Vishnu images in Himachal Pradesh (mhb)

Nārāyaṇīya (नारायणीय) section of the Mahābhārata is named after the main deity Nārāyaṇa who is glorified throughout the treatise. He is explained as supreme teacher and soul of the universe. He reclines on Śeṣa in Yoganidrā in primeval waters symbolising eternity. Bhīṣma in response to Yudhiṣṭhara’s question explains that his father told him that Nārāyaṇa is the soul of the entire world, caturmūrtī and sanātana god. Nārāyaṇa took birth as the son of Dharma along with Nara, Hari, and Kṛṣṇa. Amongst his four incarnations in the satyayuga of svāmbhuva manvaṅtara, Nara and Nārāyaṇa performed severe austerities at their āśrama in Badari.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Narayaniya in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nārāyaṇīya (नारायणीय).—i. e. nārāyaṇa + īya, adj. Referring to Nārāyaṇa, Mahābhārata 12, 13422.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Nārāyaṇīya (नारायणीय) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—Taylor. 1, 482.
—from Karṇaparvan (ch. 33). Burnell. 202^a.

Nārāyaṇīya has the following synonyms: Īśvarastotra.

2) Nārāyaṇīya (नारायणीय):—stotra, by Nārāyaṇa Bhaṭṭa of Kerala. As. Soc. of Greatbritain 1884, 449. Oppert. 2625. 2867. 4313. 6021. Rice. 286.
—[commentary] Bhaktidīpikā. Oppert. 6022.
—[commentary] by Kṛṣṇa Śāstrin. Oppert. 2626.

3) Nārāyaṇīya (नारायणीय):—śr. by Nārāyaṇa. Hz. 687 (an obscure entry).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nārāyaṇīya (नारायणीय):—[from nāra] mfn. relating to Nārāyaṇa (also -ka, [Agni-purāṇa]), treating of him, [Mahābhārata]

2) [v.s. ...] n. Name of sub voce works.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Nārāyaṇīya (नारायणीय):—(von nārāyaṇa) adj. f. ā zu Nārāyaṇa in Beziehung stehend, über ihn handelnd u.s.w.: ākhyāna [Mahābhārata 12, 13442.] upaniṣad [Weber’s Indische Studien 1, 75. 2, 79.] Ohne weiteren Zusatz als Bez. eines Werkes [Oxforder Handschriften 95,a,37.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Nārāyaṇīya (नारायणीय):——

1) Adj. (f. ā) zu Nārāyaṇa in Beziehung stehend , von ihm handelnd u.s.w. —

2) n. Titel verschiedener Werke [Private libraries (Gustav) 1.] vyākhyā f. und vyākhyābhaktidīpikā f. desgl. [ebend.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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