Namalinganushasana, Namalinga-anushasana, Nāmaliṅgānuśāsana: 4 definitions

Introduction

Namalinganushasana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Nāmaliṅgānuśāsana can be transliterated into English as Namalinganusasana or Namalinganushasana, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

[«previous (N) next»] — Namalinganushasana in Vyakarana glossary
Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Nāmaliṅgānuśāsana (नामलिङ्गानुशासन).—A treatise in which words with their genders are given. The term is usually used in connection with the great dictionary by अमरसिंह (amarasiṃha) which is called नामालिङ्गानु-शासन (nāmāliṅgānu-śāsana) or अमरकोष (amarakoṣa).

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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India history and geogprahy

[«previous (N) next»] — Namalinganushasana in India history glossary
Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature (history)

Nāmaliṅgānuśāsana (नामलिङ्गानुशासन) or Bhūriprayoga is the name of a work ascribed to Padmanābha-datta (1350-1400 C.E.): well-known as the founder of saupadma school of Sanskrit Grammar and a resident of Bhoragrāma of Mithilā (now in modern Bihar state). Also see the “New Catalogus Catalogorum” XI. p. 128.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[«previous (N) next»] — Namalinganushasana in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Nāmaliṅgānuśāsana (नामलिङ्गानुशासन) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—lex. by Jaṭādhara. Io. 217. Oxf. 189^b. L. 592.

Nāmaliṅgānuśāsana has the following synonyms: Abhidhānatantra.

2) Nāmaliṅgānuśāsana (नामलिङ्गानुशासन):—lex. by Amarasiṃha. Jones. 412. Cop. 15. 102. Pet. 728. Io. 258. 674. 1424. 1758. 2336. 2413. 2447. 2475. 2776. 2808. 2814. 2827. 2846. 3146. 3147. 3162. 3175. W. p. 223. 224. Oxf. 182^b. 351^a. Paris. (B 96. 179. 191. D. 33. 171. Gr. 33-36). Kh. 21. B. 3, 36. Report. Xxi. Ben. 33. 39. Bik. 267. Kāṭm. 9. Pheh. 5 (and—[commentary]). Rādh. 10. Oudh. Xvii, 18. Np. I, 54. Jac. 696. Bhk. 29. Kāśīn. 4. Poona. 201. 221-23. 229. Ii, 85. H. 156-59. Proceed. Asb. 1869, 224. Taylor. 1, 24. 109-11. 140. 243-45. 392-94. 396-98. 428. 477. Oppert. 18. 531. 632. 1091. 1658. 2184. 2554. 3755. 4384. 5486. 6551. 6713. 6736. 6861. 7087. 7265. Ii. 140. 387. 439. 942. 1091. 1411. 1762. 1933. 2060. 2132. 2156. 2186. 2296. 2633. 2692. 3508. 3677. 4676. 5111. 5680. 6312. 6838. 8042. 8252. 8872. 10048. 10143. Rice. 288. 290. Peters. 3, 397. Bp. 61. 265. 467. Bühler 544. 557.
—[commentary] Report. Xxii. NW. 614. Oppert. 1386. 3377. 4013. (Pañcabhaṭṭīya). Ii, 4677. 5914.
—[commentary] Amaraviveka. Rādh. 10.
—[commentary] Bṛhadvṛtti. Oppert. 2557.
—[commentary] Vyākhyāpradīpa by Acyuta Upādhyaya. Colebrooke Ii^2, 51.
—[commentary] by Appayya Dīkṣita. Oppert. 7820.
—[commentary] Kriyākalāpa by Āśādhara. Bp. 104.
—[commentary] Kāśikā by Kāśīnātha. B. 3, 36.
—[commentary] Amarakośodghāṭana by Kṣīrasvāmin. Io. 495. 2776. L. 861. K. 92. Kh. 67. B. 3, 36. Report. Xxii. [[Oudh 1876-1877]-1877], 6. Viii, 8. Xiii, 52. Xv, 42. Np. I, 54. Ii, 100. Burnell. 45^a. Gu. 5. Kāśīn. 4. H. 160. Oppert. 2555. Ii. 1836. 1977. 6191. Peters. 3, 397.
—[commentary] Bālabodhinī by Gosvāmin. K. 92.
—[commentary] Kaumudī, commenced by Nayanānanda Śarman, and completed by his pupil Rāmacandra Śarman. Io. 1161. Paris. (B 97).
—[commentary] Amarakośapañjikā or Padārthakaumudī by Nārāyaṇa Śarman, composed in 1619. Io. 13. 14. 469. 906. L. 922. Oppert. 2556. 2558. 2751. 4984. 5420. 5885. Ii, 6193.
—[commentary] Śabdārthasaṃdīpikā by Nārāyaṇa Vidyāvinoda, son of Bāṇeśvara. Io. 713.
—[commentary] Subodhinī by Nīlakaṇṭha Śarman. Io. 342.
—[commentary] Amarakośamālā by Paramānanda. Sūcīpattra. 5. L. 2064.
—[commentary] Amarakośapañjikā by Bṛhaspati. Report. Xxii.
—[commentary] Mugdhabodhinī by Bharatasena. Io. 9-11. 458-61. L. 529. 926. Np. Ii, 100.
—[commentary] Vyākhyāsudhā or Subodhinī by Bhānujī Dīkṣita. Io. 674. 1424. 2474. W. p. 223. Oxf. 182^b. Paris. (D 38. 39). K. 92. B. 3, 36. Ben. 33. 39. Rādh. 10. Jac. 696. Burnell. 46^a. Gu. 5. Mysore. 9. Bhk. 29. Bhr. 200. 649. H. 161-63. Oppert. 5887. 6823. 7821. Bühler 544.
—[commentary] Gurubālaprabodhinī by Bhānu Dīkṣita. Taylor. 1, 243. Oppert. Ii, 929. 1745. 2127. 3011. 4557. 6257. 8203.
—[commentary] by Mañjubhaṭṭa. Oppert. 4985. 5886. 6863.
—[commentary] Sārasundarī, composed in 1666, by Mathureśa Vidyālaṃkāra, son of Śivarāma. Io. 1589 -91. L. 572. 2465.
—[commentary] Amarapadapārijāta by Mallinātha. Mysore. 9. Oppert. 6822. 6862. 7819.
—[commentary] Vidvanmanoharā or Budhamanoharā by Mahādevatīrtha. L. 846. Ben. 33. Oudh. Viii, 8.
—[commentary] Amarakośaviveka by Maheśvara. L. 3045. B. 3, 36. Oudh. Xvii, 18.
—[commentary] by Mukunda Śarman, who follows the grammatical system of Vopadeva. L. 1208.
—[commentary] Trikāṇḍacintāmaṇi by Raghunātha Cakravartin. Io. 1391. L. 1726. Np. Ii, 100. 102.
—[commentary] by Rāghavendra. L. 2178.
—[commentary] Trikāṇḍaviveka by Rāmanātha. Io. 832. 1324. Np. Ii, 100.
—[commentary] Vaiṣamyakaumudī by Rāmaprasāda. Io. 1115.
—[commentary] by Rāmaśarman. Io. 377. L. 2512.
—[commentary] by Rāmasvāmin. Khn. 50.
—[commentary] by Rāmāśrama (i. e. Bhānujī). Poona. 221.
—[commentary] Pradīpamañjarī by Rāmeśvara Śarman. Io. 489.
—[commentary] Padacandrikā, composed in 1431, by Rāyamukuṭa or Bṛhaspati. Io. 15. 541. 542. 558. L. 1702. B. 3, 36. Rādh. 10. Oudh. Xviii, 22. Rice. 290. Bp. 61. 265. 467. Bühler 557.
—[commentary] by Lakṣmaṇa Śāstrin, son of Viśveśvara Śāstrin. Io. 1758.
—[commentary] by Liṅgabhaṭṭa. Np. Viii, 16. Poona. 229. Rice. 290. 292. Bühler 557.
—[commentary] by Liṅgaya Sūri. K. 90. Burnell. 45^b. Oppert. Ii, 3959. 6192.
—[commentary] Padamañjarī by Lokanātha. Io. 569.
—[commentary] Vyākhyāmṛta by Śrīkara Ācārya. L. 2751.
—[commentary] by Śrīdhara. Oudh. Xv, 48.
—[commentary] Ṭīkāsarvasva by Sarvānanda. K. 92. Burnell. 46^a. Taylor. 1, 482. Bṛhadamarakośa quoted by Rāyamukuṭa Oxf. 191^b, by Bhānujī Oxf. 182^b.

Nāmaliṅgānuśāsana has the following synonyms: Amarakośa, Trikāṇḍa.

3) Nāmaliṅgānuśāsana (नामलिङ्गानुशासन):—by Amarasiṃha. See Amarakośa.
—by Jaṭādhara. See Abhidhānatantra.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nāmaliṅgānuśāsana (नामलिङ्गानुशासन):—[=nāma-liṅgānuśāsana] [from nāma-liṅga > nāma] n. Name of [work]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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