Nalina: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Nalina means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Nalin.

In Hinduism

Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra

Nalina (नलिन):—The Sanskrit name for a classification of a ‘temple’, according to the Suprabhedāgama, which describes a list of 13 types. This list represents the earliest form of the classification of temples in the South Indian Vāstuśāstra literature. The name is also mentioned in the Īśānaśivagurudevapaddhati which features a list of 52 temple types. This list represents the classification of temples in South-India.

Vastushastra book cover
context information

Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

Discover the meaning of nalina in the context of Vastushastra from relevant books on Exotic India

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Economic Life In Ancient India (as depicted in Jain canonical literature)

Nalina (नलिन) refers to the “water lily”: a type of flower (puṣpa) commonly used in for personal and commercial purposes in ancient India. People were fond of flowers. The groves and gardens were maintained for recreational purpose. The Jain canonical texts frequently mention different horticulture products viz. fruits, vegetables and flowers which depict that horticulture was a popular pursuit of the people at that time. Gardens and parks (ārāma, ujjāṇa or nijjaṇa) were full of fruits and flowers of various kinds which besides yielding their products provided a calm andquiet place where people could enjoy the natural surroundings.

The flowers (e.g., Nalina) fulfilled the aesthetic needs of the people. At the same time they had an economic importance in as much as some people depended on its trade. It is mentioned that people of Koṅkaṇa maintained themselves by selling fruits and flowers. (see Bṛhatkalpasūtra) Flower garlands and bouquet of various designs were prepared and sold. Saffron (kuṃkuma or kesara) was an important flower product. It yielded a good income to the producers. The flower attracted the bees who yielded honey (mahu, sanskrit: madhu) of different varieties, e. g. macchiya, kuṭṭiya, bhāmara, etc.

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Nalina (नलिन) is the name of a southern province situated in West-Videha in Jambūdvīpa which is situated in the “middle world” (madhyaloka), according to chapter 2.2 [ajitanātha-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly:—“[...] Between them (i.e., the Vidyutprabha and Saumanasa Mountains) are the bhogabhumis, the Devakurus. [...] Between them (i.e., the Gandhamādana and Mālyavat Mountains) are the very charming Uttarakurus [...] East of the Devakurus and Uttarakurus, they are called East Videhas, and to the west, West Videhas, like different countries to each other. In each, there are 16 provinces, inaccessible to each other, separated by rivers and mountains, suitable to be conquered by a Cakrin. [viz., Nalina, etc.] are the southern provinces of West Videha. [...]”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of nalina in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

nalina (नलिन).—m n S A lotus.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

nalina (नलिन).—m n A lotus.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of nalina in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nalina (नलिन).—The (Indian) crane.

-nam 1 A lotus-flower, water-lily.

2) Water.

3) The Indigo plant. (nalineśayaḥ an epithet of Visnu.)

Derivable forms: nalinaḥ (नलिनः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nalina (नलिन).—n.

(-naṃ) 1. A lotus or water lily, (Nelumbium speciosum, or Nymphæa nelumbo.) 2. Water. 3. Indigo. m.

(-naḥ) 1. The Indian crane. 2. A small fruit, Karonda. f. (-nī) 1. An assemblage of lotus flowers. 2. A place abounding in lotuses. 3. The flexible stalk of a water lily. 4. A pond in which the lotus grows or may grow. 5. The Ganges of heaven. 6. The fermented and intoxicating juice of the cocoanut. E. nal to be bright, Unadi affix inan .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nalina (नलिन).—i. e. nala + ina, I. n. A lotus flower, Mahābhārata 7, 1299. Ii. f. , 1. A lotus, Nelumbium speciosum, [Bhartṛhari, (ed. Bohlen.)] 2, 57. 2. An assemblage of lotus flowers, [Vikramorvaśī, (ed. Bollensen.)] [distich] 5. 3. A pond in which the lotus grows or may grow, [Draupadīpramātha] 6, 2. 4. A branch of the heavenly Ganges, [Harivaṃśa, (ed. Calc.)] 3502. 5. A mystical name of one of the nostrils, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 4, 25, 48. 6. A proper name, 9, 21, 30.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nalina (नलिन).—[neuter] lotus flower; [feminine] ī lotus plant, group, or pond.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nalina (नलिन):—[from nala] n. ([from] nala because of its hollow stalk?) a lotus flower or water-lily, Nelumbium Speciosum (ifc. f(ā). ), [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] the indigo plant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] water, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nalina (नलिन):—(naḥ) 1. n. A lotus or waterlily; water; indigo. m. Indian crane; Karonda. () f. Assemblage of lotuses, &c.; pond; a stalk of the lotus.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Nalina (नलिन) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Ṇaliṇa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nalina in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of nalina in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Nalina (नलिन) [Also spelled nalin]:—(nm) a lotus.

context information

...

Discover the meaning of nalina in the context of Hindi from relevant books on Exotic India

Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Ṇaliṇa (णलिण) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Nalina.

2) Ṇaliṇa (णलिण) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Nalina.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

Discover the meaning of nalina in the context of Prakrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Nalina (ನಲಿನ):—

1) [noun] any of the lotus plants.

2) [noun] its flower.

3) [noun] any of a large genus (Lilium) of perennial plants of the lily family, grown from a bulb; lily.

4) [noun] its trumpet-shaped flower.

5) [noun] a Jaina age.

--- OR ---

Naḷina (ನಳಿನ):—

1) [noun] any of the varieties of lotus plants.

2) [noun] its flower.

3) [noun] any of a large genus (Lilium) of perennial plants of the lily family, grown from a bulb; lily.

4) [noun] its trumpet-shaped flower.

5) [noun] a Jaina age.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

Discover the meaning of nalina in the context of Kannada from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: