Nakha: 12 definitions

Introduction

Nakha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

Nakha (नख) denotes either the ‘nail’ of a man, or the ‘claw’ of a wild beast, such as a tiger. The trimming (nikṛntana) of the nails was a regular part of the toilet of the Vedic Indian, especially on occasions of special sanctity, when it accompanied the cleansing of the teeth.

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Nakha (नख, “nails”) refers to one of the thirty-substances of the human body according to the Visuddhimagga, as mentioned in an appendix of the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter 32-34. The Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra mentions thirty-six substances [viz., nakha]; the Sanskrit sources of both the Lesser and the Greater Vehicles, physical substances are 26 in number while the Pāli suttas list thirty-once substances.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Nakha.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘twenty’. Note: nakha is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

nakha : (m.; nt.) nail (of finger or toe); a claw.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Nakha, (Ved. nakha, cp. Sk. aṅghri foot; Gr. o)/nuc (claw, nail), Lat. unguis=Oir. inga; Ohg. nagal=E. nail) a nail of finger or toe, a claw Vin. II, 133; Sn. 610 (na aṅgulīhi nakhehi vā); J. V, 489 (pañcanakhā sattā five-nailed or —toed beings); Kh II. =Miln. 26, cp. taca (pañcatacakaṃ); KhA 43; VvA. 7 (dasa-nakhasamodhāna putting the 10 fingers together); PvA. 152, 192; Sdhp. 104. (Page 345)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

nakha (नख).—n m (S) A nail of a finger or toe. Pr. jēthēṃ nakhānēṃ kāma hōtēṃ tēthēṃ kuṛhāḍa kaśālā Why use a sledge-hammer to drive in a tack? 2 A claw or talon (of birds or beasts). 3 n A fragrant drug, Unguis odoratus or Black Byzantino. 4 A scale (as of the khavalyā mārjara or Pangolin). 5 (For nakha- vikha) Poison of the nails. v bādha, lāga, dhāva. āpalīñca nakhēṃ āpaṇāsa vikhēṃ Expresses suffering from one's own malice or evil. Ps. xxxiv. 21. jēthēṃ nakha nakō tēthēṃ kuṛhāḍa lāvaṇēṃ See the proverb at the head. To apply hard measures where the very slightest severity is unnecessary. nakha dṛṣṭīsa na paḍaṇēṃ To be utterly covered or concealed. nakha nakha bōlaṇēṃ To speak loftily or floutingly, with a hoity toity air and toss. nakhabhara A very small bit or quantity, a nailful. nakha śiraṇēṃ g. of s. To obtain entrance; to get a finger in. nakhā ēvaḍhā Very small, little, scanty, petty, insignificant--a thing, a business, a debt, fault, person. nakhāṃ bōṭāṃ- vara-kāma karaṇēṃ To do or act generally with delicate or dainty airs;--khēḷaviṇēṃ or cāḷaviṇēṃ To amuse, beguile, bamboozle; to wind over one's thumb;--cālaṇēṃ To walk mincingly or delicately;--jēvaṇēṃ To eat daintily, with picking and tossing about;--divasa mōjaṇēṃ To anticipate with impatient eagerness; to count the days. nakhāṃlā āga lāgalī (Fire has caught at the toe-nails.) Disaster or adversity is but begun (ajhūna sārēṃ aṅga jaḷāyācēṃ āhē). nakhīṃ dōṣa nāhīṃ or nakhāṃlā mātī lāgalī nāhīṃ Castus ad unguem. nakhēṃ cāvīta-kuḍatuḍīta-vājavīta basaṇēṃ (To sit biting or striking together one's nails.) To be out of employ: also to be baffled, foiled, posed.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

nakha (नख).—n A nail of a finger or toe. jēthēṃ nakhānēṃ kāma hōtēṃ tēthēṃ kuṛhāḍa kaśālā? Why use a sledge-hammer to drive in a tack? A claw or taion (of birds or beasts). āpalīñca nakhēṃ āpaṇāsa vikhēṃ Expresses suffer- ing from one's own malice or evil. jēthēṃ nakha nakō tēthēṃ kunhāḍa lāvaṇēṃ (See the pro- verb at the head.) To apply hard measures where the very slightest severity is unnecessary. nakha dṛṣṭīsa na paḍaṇēṃ To be utterly covered or conceal- ed. nakha nakha bōlaṇēṃ To speak loftily or floutingly, with a hoity toity air and toss. nakhabhara A very small bit or quan- tity, a nailful. nakha śiraṇēṃ To obtain en- trance; to get a finger in. nakhāēvaḍhā Very small. nakhābōṭāvara kāma karaṇēṃ To do or act generally with delicate or dainty airs;-khēḷaviṇēṃ or cāḷaviṇēṃ To amuse beguile, bamboozle;-cālaṇēṃ To walk mincingly or delicately;-jēvaṇēṃ To eat daintily, with picking and tossing about;-divasa mōjaṇēṃ To anticipate with impatient eagerness. nakhāṃlā āga lāgalī (ajūna sārēṃ aṅga jaḷāvayācēṃ āhē (Fire has caught at the toe-nails.) Disaster or adversity is but begun. nakhīṃ dōṣa nāhīṃ or nakhāṃlā mātī lāgalī nāhīṃ Castus ad unguen. nakhēṃ cāvīta-kuḍatuḍīta-vājavīta basaṇēṃ. To be out of employ: also to be baffl- ed, foiled.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nakha (नख).—

1) A nail of a finger or of a toe, claw, talon; नखानां पाण्डित्यं प्रकटयतु कस्मिन् मृगपतिः (nakhānāṃ pāṇḍityaṃ prakaṭayatu kasmin mṛgapatiḥ) Bv.1.2; R.2.31;12.22.

-kham A kind of perfume; Nm.

2) The number 'twenty'.

3) A eunuch; L. D. B.

-khaḥ A part, portion.

Derivable forms: nakhaḥ (नखः), nakham (नखम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nakha (नख).—mf. (-khaḥ-khī) A finger nail. m.

(-khaḥ) A part, a portion. nf. (-khaṃ-khī) A perfume, a dried substance, of a brown colour, and of the shape of a nail; apparently, a dried shell-fish, used as a perfume. f. (-khī) A vegetable perfume, different from the one above, though known by the same name, Nak'Hi. E. na privative, kha sense; or nah to bind kha Unadi affix, the radical ha rejected. nakham chidram atra .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nakha (नख).—I. m. and n. A nail of a finger or of a toe, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 4, 35. Ii. n. and f. khī, A certain perfume.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nakha (नख).—[masculine] [neuter] (adj. —° [feminine] ī) nail (of finger or toe), claw.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nakha (नख):—mn. ([from] √nagh [?] cf. naghamāra; [probably] not [from] na + kha in spite of [Pāṇini 6-3, 75]; ifc. f(ī). ) a finger-nail, toe-nail, claw, talon, the spur of a cock, [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc. (khāni-√kṛ, or √kḷp, to cut the nails, [Kauśika-sūtra; Manu-smṛti])

2) = 20 [Sūryasiddhānta]

3) nf (ī). Unguis Odoratus, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā; Hemādri’s Caturvarga-cintāmaṇi]

4) m. part, portion.

5) cf. [Greek] ὄνυξ, stem ὀ-νυχ; [Latin] unguis; Lit. nágas; [Slavonic or Slavonian] nogŭtĭ; [Anglo-Saxon] naegel; [English] nail; [German] Nagel.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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