Nagasana, aka: Naga-asana, Nāgāsana, Nagashana, Nāgāśana, Naga-ashana; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Nagasana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Nāgāśana can be transliterated into English as Nagasana or Nagashana, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Yoga (school of philosophy)

Nāgāsana (नागासन) is one of the eighty-four āsanas (postures) taught by Śiva, according to the Haṭharatnāvalī 3.7-20. It is said that Ādinātha (Śiva) hand-picked 84 yoga postures from 84,00,000 living beings and taught them for the purpose of introducing physical health and well-being to the human body. The compound nāgāsana translates to nāga and āsana (posture).

The 17th-century Haṭharatnāvalī is a Sanskrit reference book dealing with these āsanas (eg., nāgāsana) which form a major constituent of the haṭhayoga practice. It was written by Śrīnivāsa.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Yoga
Yoga book cover
context information

Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nāgāśana (नागाशन).—

1) a peacock; Pt.1.159.

2) an epithet of Garuḍa.

3) a lion.

Derivable forms: nāgāśanaḥ (नागाशनः).

Nāgāśana is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms nāga and aśana (अशन).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Relevant definitions

Search found 1242 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

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Padmasana
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Simhasana
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Bhadrasana
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Kukkutasana
Kukkuṭāsana (कुक्कुटासन).—a. particular posture of an ascetic in religious meditation. Derivabl...
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Vajrasana
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Yogasana
Yogāsana (योगासन) refers to one of the asanas (sitting poses) assumed by the deities in sculptu...
Svastikasana
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