Nagaraka, Nāgaraka: 12 definitions

Introduction:

Nagaraka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

A Sakyan township near Medatalumpa. From there Pasenadi, accompanied by Digha Karayana, paid his last visit to the Buddha, as recorded in the Dhammacetiya Sutta. M.ii.118.

The Buddha evidently once stayed in Nagaraka, for in the Cula Sunnata Sutta, Ananda is reported as reminding the Buddha that once, while staying at Nagaraka, the Buddha had remarked that he lived with the Void a great deal.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Nāgaraka.—(HD), same as Nāgarika; chief officer of the city; the city prefect of police. See Arthaśāstra, II. 36; Kāma- sūtra, V. 5. 9 (the commentator explaining Nāgaraka as Daṇḍa- pāśika). Cf. Talavara. Note: nāgaraka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nagaraka in Pali glossary
Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Nagaraka, (nt.) a small city D. I, 146=169, quoted J. I, 391. (Page 345)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nāgaraka (नागरक).—a. [nagare bhavaḥ vuñ]

1) Town-bred, town-born.

2) Polite, courteous, courtly; नागरिकवृत्त्या संज्ञापयैनाम् (nāgarikavṛttyā saṃjñāpayainām) Ś.5; साधु आर्य नागरिकोऽसि (sādhu ārya nāgariko'si) V.2.

3) Clever, shrewd, cunning (vidagdha).

-kaḥ 1 A citizen.

2) A polite or courteous man, a gallant, one who shows exaggerated attention to his first mistress while he is courting some one else.

3) One who has contracted the vices of a town.

4) A thief.

5) An artist.

6) The chief of the police; V.5; Ś.6.

7) A city-superintendent; cf. नागरिक- प्रणिधिः (nāgarika- praṇidhiḥ) Kau. A.

8) A kind of coitus; ऊरुमूलोपरि स्थित्वा योषिदूरुद्वयं रमेत् । ग्रीवां धृत्वा कराभ्यां च बन्धो नागरको मतः (ūrumūlopari sthitvā yoṣidūrudvayaṃ ramet | grīvāṃ dhṛtvā karābhyāṃ ca bandho nāgarako mataḥ) || Ratimañjarī.

9) (pl.) planets opposite to each other.

-kam 1 Dry ginger. (-rikam) The toll levied from a town.

See also (synonyms): nāgarika.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nāgaraka (नागरक).—m.

(-kaḥ) 1. The orange; see nāgaraṅga 2. A thief. 3. An artist. E. nāgara, and vuñ aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nāgaraka (नागरक).—[nāgara + ka], m. The chief of a town, [Śākuntala, (ed. Böhtlingk.)] 73, 1, v. r.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nāgaraka (नागरक).—([feminine] rikā) coming from or living in town; [masculine] citizen, chief of a town or police; [feminine] rikā a woman’s name; [neuter] = [preceding] [neuter]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nāgaraka (नागरक):—[from nāgara] mf(ikā)n. living in a town (opp. to āraṇyaka), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] clever, cunning, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] m. a citizen, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] chief of a town, police-officer, [Śakuntalā] ([varia lectio] for rika) applied to planets opposed to each other, [Varāha-mihira] (cf. nāgara-nṛpati and -yāyi-graha)

5) [v.s. ...] an artist, [Horace H. Wilson]

6) [v.s. ...] a thief, [Horace H. Wilson]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nāgaraka (नागरक):—(kaḥ) 1. m. The orange; a thief; an artist.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nagaraka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Nagaraka (ನಗರಕ):—[noun] = ನಗರಪಾಲಕ [nagarapalaka].

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Nāgaraka (ನಾಗರಕ):—

1) [noun] an officer in charge of guarding a town.

2) [noun] a man who promotes amusements for a king or a man of rank, by keeping his company.

3) [noun] a particular kind of position in coition.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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