Nagaraja, Nāgarāja, Naga-raja, Nāgarājā: 16 definitions

Introduction:

Nagaraja means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Naagraj.

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In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Nāgarāja (नागराज) is the Sanskrit name for a deity (“King of the nāgas”) to be worshipped during raṅgapūjā, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra 3.1-8. Accordingly, the master of the dramatic art who has been initiated for the purpose shall consecrate the playhouse after he has made obeisance (e.g., to Nāgarāja).

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram (shaivism)

Nāgarāja (नागराज) refers to the “king of the snakes” and represents one of the attributes of Svacchanda, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult. Accordingly, “O goddess, Svacchanda is in the middle, within the abode of the triangle. Very powerful, he has five faces with three times five flaming eyes. [...] O fair lady, my attributes—trident, dagger, sword, the king of the snakes [i.e., nāgarāja], and rosary—adorn the right (arms). O beloved, a skull, double-headed drum, javelin, noose and goad—(these) are my divine, brilliant and very auspicious weapons that (are held) in the left (hands). The king of snakes (hangs) on the shoulder and a garland of skulls hangs (from the neck). There is a necklace of scorpions around the throat and the ears are adorned with snakes. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Nāgarāja (नागराज) refers to Kings of the Nāga according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter XLVI.—Accordingly, “just as the Nāga kings (Nāgarāja) and the birds with golden wings (Garuḍa), despite their great power (anubhāva) and their power of transformation, belong to the animal destiny (tiryaggati), so the Asuras belong to a good destiny, but one which is of lower order. [...] The Nāga kings (nāgarāja) and the birds with golden wings, even though they too enjoy bliss, walk horizontally and resemble animals in shape; this is why they are classed in the animal destiny”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nagaraja in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

nāgarāja : (m.) king of the Nāgas.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Nāgarājā refers to: king of the Nāgas, i.e. serpents J. II, 111; III, 275; Sn. 379 (Erāvaṇa, see detail SnA 368); DhA. I, 359; III, 231, 242 sq. (Ahicchatta); IV, 129 sq. (Paṇṇaka);

Note: nāgarājā is a Pali compound consisting of the words nāga and rājā.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nāgarāja (नागराज).—

1) an epithet of Śeṣa.

2) a large elephant; अधस्तान्नागराजाय सोमायोर्ध्वं दिशं ददौ (adhastānnāgarājāya somāyordhvaṃ diśaṃ dadau) Hariv.

Derivable forms: nāgarājaḥ (नागराजः).

Nāgarāja is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms nāga and rāja (राज).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nāgarāja (नागराज).—m.

(-jaḥ) Ananta, the chief of the Nagas. E. nāga, and rāja king.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nāgarāja (नागराज).—1. the king of the serpents, [Kathāsaritsāgara, (ed. Brockhaus.)] 22, 209. 2. a great elephant, Mahābhārata 4, 1679.

Nāgarāja is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms nāga and rāja (राज).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nāgarāja (नागराज).—[masculine] the same, also king of the elephants, i.e. a large elephant.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Nāgarāja (नागराज) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—of the Ṭāka family, son of Jālapa, grandson of Vidyādhara (Bhr. p. 198): Śataka. K. 60. B. 2, 88. Pheh. 6. Poona. 237. Bhāvaśataka kāvya. Śṛṅgāraśataka.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nāgarāja (नागराज):—[=nāga-rāja] [from nāga] m. idem, [ib.] (also jan)

2) [v.s. ...] a large or noble elephant, [ib.]

3) [v.s. ...] Name of an author (also -keśava)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nāgarāja (नागराज):—[nāga-rāja] (jaḥ) 1. m. Ananta, the king of the Nāgas.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nagaraja in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nagaraja in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Nāgarāja (नागराज) [Also spelled naagraj]:—(nm) the mythological king of snakes called [śeṣanāga]; a huge snake.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Nagarāja (ನಗರಾಜ):—[noun] = ನಗಪ [nagapa].

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Nāgarāja (ನಾಗರಾಜ):—[noun] Ādiśeṣa, the king of serpents.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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