Mumukshu, Mumukṣu: 16 definitions

Introduction:

Mumukshu means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Mumukṣu can be transliterated into English as Mumuksu or Mumukshu, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Mumukshu in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Mumukṣu (मुमुक्षु) refers to those “seeking salvation”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.40.—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] after going beyond Alakā, the capital of the king of Yakṣas and the Saugandhika park, they saw the fig-tree of Śiva. [...] Beneath that vaṭa of yogic potentialities, Viṣṇu and other Devas saw Śiva seated. The vaṭa was the refuge of those seeking salvation (i.e., mumukṣu). Śiva was being served and venerated by Brahmā’s sons, the great Siddhas engrossed in devotion to Śiva joyously. They were calm. Their very physical body inspired calmness”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Brhad Bhagavatamrtam

Mumukṣu (मुमुक्षु) refers to:—Those seeking liberation. (cf. Glossary page from Śrī Bṛhad-bhāgavatāmṛta).

Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Mumukṣu (मुमुक्षु) refers to “those desiring liberation”, according to the Devīpurāṇa verse 88.1-3.—Accordingly, “People desiring liberation (mumukṣu) worship the Mothers by way of the Vedas and the Śaiva Tantric revelation. They are also worshipped in accordance with the Gāruḍatantras, Bhūtatantras, and Bālatantras. Beneficent, they bring all endeavors to fruition, and are like wish-fulfilling jewels. Heretics of the future—[viz.] the Buddhist proponents of Gāruḍa Tantra—will worship them according to their own methods, devoted to their own ways, dear child. They give rewards that accord with any disposition wise people worship them with, whether they be Brahmins or even lowborn outcastes”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Mumukṣu (मुमुक्षु) refers to a “Sādhaka who aspires for liberation”, according to the Brahmayāmala-tantra (or Picumata), an early 7th century Śaiva text consisting of twelve-thousand verses.—A passage in chapter specifies that a Sādhaka who aspires for liberation (the mumukṣu), rather than supernatural experiences and powers (bhoga), should devote himself to a simplified pantheon worship (yāga), giving up all other rituals (karman) and “abiding by the path of yoga”. While not abandoned, outer ritual here assumes a simplified form, the emphasis shifting decidedly toward inner practice. Thus the degree to which meditational disciplines feature primarily as integral elements of ritual may simply reflect the Brahmayāmala’s emphasis on supernatural attainment (siddhi): the path of yoga, ultimately, is for seekers of liberation.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

mumukṣu (मुमुक्षु).—m S A sage abstracted from all human passion and feeling, and preparing himself for emancipation. 2 One desirous of mōkṣa or liberation from mundane and individual existence.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

mumukṣu (मुमुक्षु).—m One desirous of mōkṣa.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mumukṣu (मुमुक्षु).—a.

1) Desirous of releasing or liberating.

2) Wishing to discharge.

3) About to shoot (arrows &c.); तस्यापरेष्वपि मृगेषु शरान् मुमुक्षोः (tasyāpareṣvapi mṛgeṣu śarān mumukṣoḥ) R.9.58.

4) Wishing to be free from worldly existence, striving after final emancipation.

-kṣuḥ A sage striving after final emancipation or beatitude; अन्तर्यश्च मुमुक्षुभिर्नियमितप्राणादिभिर्मृग्यते (antaryaśca mumukṣubhirniyamitaprāṇādibhirmṛgyate) V.1.1; Kumārasambhava 2.51; एवं ज्ञात्वा कृतं कर्म पूर्वैरपि मुमुक्षुभिः (evaṃ jñātvā kṛtaṃ karma pūrvairapi mumukṣubhiḥ) Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 4.15.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mumukṣu (मुमुक्षु).—m.

(-kṣuḥ) 1. A sage, abstracted from all human passion and feeling, and preparing himself for eternal emancipation. 2. Any one anxious for liberation, especially from mundane existence. E. muc to liberate, in the desiderative form, u aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mumukṣu (मुमुक्षु).—i. e. mumukṣa, desider. of muc, + u, I. adj. 1. Desiring to dart (viz. arrows), [Raghuvaṃśa, (ed. Stenzler.)] 9, 58. 2. Anxious for liberation from mundane existence or final beatitude, [Vedāntasāra, (in my Chrestomathy.)] in Chr. 203, 22; [Vikramorvaśī, (ed. Bollensen.)] [distich] 1. Ii. m. A sage abstracted from all human passion.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mumukṣu (मुमुक्षु).—[adjective] desirous of freeing ([accusative] or —°) or of being freed, [especially] from mundane existence.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mumukṣu (मुमुक्षु):—[from muc] mfn. desirous of freeing, wishing to deliver from ([ablative]), [Mahābhārata]

2) [v.s. ...] eager to be free (from mundane existence), striving after emancipation, [Ṛg-veda; Upaniṣad] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] wishing to let go or give up ([accusative]), [Kathāsaritsāgara]

4) [v.s. ...] wishing to discharge or shed or emit or shoot or hurl or send forth ([accusative] or [compound]), [Mahābhārata; Raghuvaṃśa]

5) [v.s. ...] m. a sage who strives after emancipation, [Horace H. Wilson]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mumukṣu (मुमुक्षु):—(kṣuḥ) 1. m. A sage; any one seeking absorption in Brahm.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Mumukṣu (मुमुक्षु) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Mumukkhu.

[Sanskrit to German]

Mumukshu in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Mumukṣu (ಮುಮುಕ್ಷು):—[adjective] desirous of attaining salvation.

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Mumukṣu (ಮುಮುಕ್ಷು):—[noun] a person desirous of attaining salvation.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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