Maunin, Mauni, Maunī: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Maunin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Maunin (मौनिन्) refers to “silence”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.19. Accordingly as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] four drops of my semen virile got displaced and fell on the ground like drops of dew as a result of staring into her face. O sage, then I was stunned into silence (maunin). I was surprised. I became suspicious. I covered up the semen drops lest anyone should see them”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Maunin (मौनिन्) refers to “one who always keeps silent”, according to the Brahmayāmala verse 21.5cd-10.—Accordingly, “(One who is engaged) in the Vow of Nakedness is always naked and has no upper garment. His body is covered in ashes and his hair is always dishevelled. (He should) always worship the place where (he practices) Yoga. He should wander about at midday. O dear one, whether in a village or a town he must certainly wander about. He has deposited the mantra on his body and, devoid of the five insignia, he always keeps silent [i.e.,. maunin]. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Maunin (मौनिन्) refers to “(one) maintaining silence”, according to the 9th-century Sarvajñānottaratantra chapter 18.—Accordingly, “Next, I shall teach the best observance among observances, which is known as the Śiva-vrata and which is revered by Asuras and Gods alike. [...] He should dwell constantly in a temple of Śiva, eating alms, controlling his senses, devoted to recitation and meditation, maintaining silence (maunin), venerating Śiva, the fire and his guru. When a year has passed, he will become equal to Śiva. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

Maunī (मौनी).—a S Silent: also taciturn. 2 That has overcome his passions and retired from the world; an anchorite or hermit; a religious sage.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

Maunī (मौनी).—a Silent; taciturn. A religious sage.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Maunin (मौनिन्).—a. (- f.) [मौनमस्यास्ति इनि (maunamasyāsti ini)] Observing a vow of silence, silent, taciturn; तुल्यनिन्दास्तुतिर्मौनी संतुष्टो येनकेनचित् (tulyanindāstutirmaunī saṃtuṣṭo yenakenacit) Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 12.19. -m. A holy sage, an ascetic, a hermit; also मौनिः (mauniḥ); एवं ब्रुवति मौनीश आगताश्चापवाहकाः (evaṃ bruvati maunīśa āgatāścāpavāhakāḥ) A. Rām.1.6.21.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Maunin (मौनिन्).—mfn. (-nī-ninī-ni) Silent, taciturn. m. (-nī) An ascetic, a hermit, a religious sage, one who has overcome his passions and retired from the world. E. mauna silence, and ini aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Maunin (मौनिन्).—i. e. mauna + in, I. adj., f. , Silent, Böhtl. Ind. Spr. 1677; [Rājataraṅgiṇī] 5, 304. Ii. m. An ascetic.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Maunin (मौनिन्).—[adjective] keeping silence; [abstract] nitva [neuter]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Maunī (मौनी):—[from mauna] f. Name of the 15th day in the dark half of the month Phālguna (when a [particular] form of ablution is performed in silence), [Colebrooke]

2) Mauni (मौनि):—[from mauna] Vṛddhi form of muni, in [compound]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Maunin (मौनिन्):—[from mauna] mfn. observing silence, silent, taciturn, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] m. = muni (sometimes ifc. in proper names e.g. gopīnātha-m).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Maunin (मौनिन्):—[(nī-ninī-ni) a.] Silent. m. An ascetic.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Maunin (मौनिन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Moṇi.

[Sanskrit to German]

Maunin in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Maunī (मौनी):—(a) under a vow not to speak, pledged to quiescence.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Mauni (ಮೌನಿ):—[noun] a person who is refraining from talking or from making any speech.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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