Mantrya: 2 definitions

Introduction:

Mantrya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Mantrya (मन्त्र्य) means to “energize” (the body), according to Tantric texts such as the Kubjikāmata-tantra, the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “One should first energize (mantrya) the body well purified with Aghora (mantra). He can eat without fear, for that (mantra turns all he eats into) nectar. Having invoked (the deity) of a (particular) direction, he should go (in that direction) placing the left foot forward first. He should wander even established in the middle of the Moon of both. When eating and (lying) in bed, he is always established in the middle of the Moon. O best of ladies, she should always be mounted on the Moon”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Mantrya (मन्त्र्य) (Cf. Saṃmantrya) refers to “consulting” (amongst one another) [?], according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.15 (“The penance and reign of Tārakāsura”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated: “Thus with ardour, the king of the demons [i.e., Tāraka] performed the severe penance duly unbearable even to those who heard about it. [...] Then all those gods and sages consulted one another [i.e., su-saṃ-mantrya] and in their great fright they came to my world and approached me in a piteous plight. Bowing to and eulogising me with palms joined in reverence, all of them explained everything to me distressed in mind that they were. [...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of mantrya in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

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