Wisdom Library Logo

Manoramā, aka: Manorama; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Manoramā means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. Check out some of the following descriptions and leave a comment if you want to add your own contribution to this article.

The Sanskrit term Manoramā can be transliterated into English as Manorama, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purāṇa

Manoramā (मनोरमा) is the name of a mind-born ‘divine mother’ (mātṛ), created for the purpose of drinking the blood of the Andhaka demons, according to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.8. The Andhaka demons spawned out of every drop of blood spilled from the original Andhakāsura (Andhaka-demon). According to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.35, “Most terrible they (eg., Manoramā) all drank the blood of those Andhakas and become exceedingly satiated.”

The Matsyapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 20,000 metrical verses, dating from the 1st-millennium BCE. The narrator is Matsya, one of the ten major avatars of Viṣṇu.

Source: Wisdom Library: The Matsya-purāṇa

1a) Manoramā (मनोरमा).—A mind-born mother.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 179. 26.

1b) An Apsarasa.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 6.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

about this context:

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Manoramā (मनोरमा) is the name of an Apsara created for the sake of a type of dramatic perfomance. Acording to the Nāṭyaśāstra 1.46-51, after Brahmā asked Bharata for materials necessary for the Graceful Style (kaiśikī: a type of performance, or prayoga), Bharata answered “This Style cannot be practised properly by men except with the help of women”. Therefore, Brahmā created with his mind several apsaras (celestial nymphs), such as Manoramā, who were skillful in embellishing the drama.

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

about this context:

Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

Śāktism (Śākta philosophy)

Manoramā (मनोरमा):—First wive of king Dhruvasandhi (son of Puṣpa) of the Solar Dynasty. Manoramā gave birth to the beautiful child named Sudarśana. See the Devī-bhāgavata-purāṇa 3.14 (The glories of Devī).

Source: Wisdom Library: Śrīmad Devī Bhāgavatam

about this context:

Śākta (शाक्त, shakta) or Śāktism (shaktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devī) is revered and worshipped. Śāka literature includes a range of scriptures, including various tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

In Buddhism

Pali

manorama : (adj.) delightful.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

about this context:

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

1) Manorama (मनोरम) refers to a species of Graiveyaka gods, who are in turn a subclass of the Kalpātīta gods, according to Jain cosmological texts in both the Śvetāmbara and Digambara tradition. The Kalpātīta (those born beyond heavens) represent a sub-species of the Vaimānika gods, which in turn represents the fourth main classification of devas (gods).

The Graiveyakas (eg., the Maṇoramas) do not bind karmans, are 1-sensed class of beings and have an immovable body, warm splendour, cold lustre, animal state of existence, ānupūrvī and āyus.

2) Manorama (मनोरम) is the name of class of kinnaras according to both the Digambara and Śvetāmbara traditions. The kinnaras refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas). The kinnaras are black in complexion and their caitya-vṛkṣas (sacred-tree) is Aśoka according to both traditions.

3) Manorama (मनोरम) is the name of class of mahoraga gods according to the Śvetāmbara tradition, while the Digambara does not recognize this class. The mahoraga refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas). The mahoragas are are dark or black in complexion and the Nāga is their caitya-vṛkṣa (sacred-tree).

The deities such as the Manoramas are defined in ancient Jain cosmological texts such as the Saṃgrahaṇīratna in the Śvetāmbara tradition or the Tiloyapaṇṇati by Yativṛṣabha (5th century) in the Digambara tradition.

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Relevant definitions

Search found 10 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Kinnara
Kinnara (किन्नर).—A class of vyantara gods;—According to the Tiloyapaṇṇatti they are divided in...
Sudarśana
1) Sudarśana (सुदर्शन) is the father of Aranātha, the eighteenth of twenty-four Tīrthaṅkaras in...
Apsara
Apsara (अप्सर).—Divine dancers born of Muni and Kaśyapa. Joined Gandharvas in milking the...
Mahoraga
Mahoraga (महोरग).—The mahoragas are a group of deities categorised as belonging to the vyantara...
Manuñña
Manuñña, (adj.) (cp. Class. Sk. manojña) pleasing, delightful, beautiful Vv 8417 (=manorama VvA...
Dhruvasandhi
Dhruvasandhi (ध्रुवसन्धि):—In days of yore, there reigned in the country of Kosala, th...
Kahārayaṇakosa
In +1101 or 1102 Devabhadra in Bharuyaccha completed his Prakrit Kahārayaṇakosa. This is a J...
Graiveyaka
Graiveyaka (ग्रैवेयक) refers to a subclass of the Kalpātīta gods, according to Jain cosmologica...
Atimanorama
Atimanorama, (adj.) (ati + manorama) very charming J. I, 60. (Page 20)
Kalpātīta
Kalpātīta (कल्पातीत, “kalpa-less”).—One of the two classes of the species of the Vaimānika gods...

Relevant text

Search found 25 books containing Manoramā or Manorama. You can also click to the full overview containing English textual excerpts. Below are direct links for the 20 most relevant articles:

- Was this explanation helpufll? Leave a comment:

Make this page a better place for research and define the term yourself in your own words.

You have to be a member in order to post comments. Click here to login or click here to become a member.