Manjushri, aka: Manjusri, Mañjuśrī, Manju-shri; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Manjushri means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Mañjuśrī can be transliterated into English as Manjusri or Manjushri, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Manjushri in Mahayana glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mañjuśrī (मञ्जुश्री) is one of the pravrajita (monastic) Bodhisattvas accompanying the Buddha at Rājagṛha on the Gṛdhrakūṭaparvata, mentioned in a list of twenty-two in to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter 13.—They were at the head of countless thousands of koṭinayuta of Bodhisattva-mahāsattvas who were all still awaiting succession and will still accede to Buddhahood. He is also known as Wen chou che li or Miao tö .

Mañjuśrī is mentioned as a Bodhisattva of the Padmāvatī universe in chapter XV.—Accordingly, “the universe Houa tsi (Padmāvati) has been mentioned which belongs to the Buddha P’ou houa (Samantakusuma), where the Bodhisattva Miao tö (Mañjuśrī), the Bodhisattva Chan tchou yi (Susthitamati) and other very powerful Bodhisattvas dwell”.

Mañjuśrī is mentioned as a Bodhisattva who is praised by the Buddhas, according to chapter XLVII.—Accordingly, “the Buddhas praise these Bodhisattvas. Who are they? They are, for example, Wen-chou-che-li (Mañjuśrī), P’i-mo-lo-kie (Vimalakīrti), Kouan-che-yin (Avalokiteśvara), Ta-che-tche (Mahāsthāmaprāpta), Pien-ki (Samantabhadra). These leaders among the Bodhisattvas appear in the threefold world (traidhātuka), create for themselves innumerable bodies by transformation, enter into saṃsāra and convert beings. From such exploits (adbhuta) comes the entire very profound prajñāpāramitā”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

Discover the meaning of manjushri or manjusri in the context of Mahayana from relevant books on Exotic India

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Mañjuśrī (मञ्जुश्री) is one of the sixteen bodhisattvas appearing in the Vajradhātu-mahāmaṇḍala, according to the Nāmamantrārthāvalokinī v5.38-41. The Nāmamantrārthāvalokinī (literally, ‘an explanation of the nāma-mantras’) is a commentary (ṭīkā) on the Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti.

Mañjuśrī is a name of Mañjuśrī (the embodiement of non-dual knowledge) and, together with other names, forms the core essence of the Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti. The Nāmamantrārthāvalokinī provides the practitioner a sādhana (‘meditative practice’) to turn these names into mantras. These mantras are chanted for the benefit of all beings, and then placed and contemplated in the Vajradhātu-mahāmaṇḍala, which is an extended version of the Vajradhātu-maṇḍala.

The Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti (lit. ‘chanting of the names of Mañjuśrī’) is a short but influential Buddhist tantra, containing the essence of the teachings of Śākyamuni (the historical Buddha). It was composed by Vilāsavajra in the 8th century and contains 3000 verses in the anuṣṭubh meter.

Source: Wisdom Library: Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti
Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

Discover the meaning of manjushri or manjusri in the context of Tibetan Buddhism from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Buddhism)

Manjushri in Buddhism glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mañjuśrī (मञ्जुश्री) refers to the fifth of the “eight Bodhisattvas” (aṣṭabodhisattva) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 12). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (eg., aṣṭa-bodhisattva and Mañjuśrī). The work is attributed to Nagarguna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgrahaManjusri (Chinese: Wen shu; Japanese: Monju), Bodhisattva of Wisdom, believed to have been a disciple of Shakyamuni. With Samantabhadra, he represents the two elemental aspects of Buddhism: Wisdom and Compassio n. He is often depicted holding a sword and/or a lotus, and seated on a lion.Source: The Art of Asia: Who is Who in Heaven

Mañjushrī Skt. (Jap., Monju), lit., “He Who Is Noble and Gentle”; the bodhisattva of wis­dom, one of the most important figures of the Buddhist pantheon. He first appears in the Ārya-mañjushrī-mūlakalpa, a work dating from before the 4th century. Usually Mañjushrī is iconographically depicted with two lotus blossoms at the level of his head, on which his attributes—a sword and a book of the prajñāpāramitā literature—are placed. These attributes stand for the wisdom embodied by Mañjushrī, which dispels the darkness of ignorance.

Source: Shambala Publications: General

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Manjushri in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mañjuśrī (मञ्जुश्री).—Name of a बोधिसत्त्व (bodhisattva).

Derivable forms: mañjuśrīḥ (मञ्जुश्रीः).

Mañjuśrī is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mañju and śrī (श्री).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of manjushri or manjusri in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 2159 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Shrivatsa
Śrīvatsa (mole on the chest of Viṣṇu) refers to one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “ac...
Shri
Śrī (श्री) or Śirikā.—q.v., 3 and 4.--- OR --- Śrī (श्री) or Śirī.—(1) n. of a devakumārikā in...
Shridhara
Śrīdhara (श्रीधर).—Another important commentary on Praśastapāda’s Bhāṣya is Nyāyakaṇḍalī writte...
Shrikantha
Śrīkaṇṭha (श्रीकण्ठ) refers to one of the eighteen teachers of Āgama digests (paddhati) accordi...
Shriparvata
Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत).—A sacred mountain. Those who go to this mountain and offer worship to Ś...
Shrikhanda
Śrīkhaṇḍa.—(LP), also spelt śrīṣaṇḍa; sandal wood. Note: śrīkhaṇḍa is defined in the “Indian ep...
Manju
Mañju (मञ्जु).—a. [mañj-un]1) Lovely, beautiful, charming, sweet, pleasing, agreeable, attracti...
Shrikara
Śrīkara (श्रीकर) is the name of an undatable writer of Nyāya-Vaiśeṣika system.—Two other author...
Shrinivasa
1) Śrīnivāsa (श्रीनिवास) (son of Lakṣmī and Veṅkaṭeśa).—Though the identification of Śrīnivāsa,...
Shrikanta
Śrīkānta (श्रीकान्त).—an epithet of Viṣṇu. Derivable forms: śrīkāntaḥ (श्रीकान्तः).Śrīkānta is ...
Shripura
Śrīpura is mentioned in the  “Aḍhabhāra plates of Mahā-Nannarāja” (c. 560 A.D.).  Śrī...
Candrashri
Candraśrī (चन्द्रश्री).—n. of a Bodhisattva: Gv 4.3.
Shrimukha
Śrīmukha (श्रीमुख) or Śrīmukhāgama refers to one of upāgamas (supplementary scriptures) of the ...
Shrividya
Śrīvidyā (श्रीविद्या) is one of Shakta Tantrism’s most influential and theologically sophist...
Shrirama
Śrīrāma (श्रीराम) refers to one of the various Vibhava manifestations according to the Īśvarasa...

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: