Manjusha, Mañjūsā, Manjusa, Mañjūṣā, Mañjuṣā, Mamjusa, Mamjusha: 20 definitions

Introduction:

Manjusha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Mañjūṣā and Mañjuṣā can be transliterated into English as Manjusa or Manjusha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

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In Hinduism

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Mañjūṣā (मञ्जूषा).—A popular name given to the work परमलघुमञ्जूषा (paramalaghumañjūṣā) of Nāgeśa on अर्थ-प्रक्रिया (artha-prakriyā) (science or method of interpretation) in Vyākaraṇa, which is generally read by advanced students. Nāgeśa has also written a bigger work on the same subject लघुमञ्जूषा (laghumañjūṣā) which sometimes is also referred to by the word मञ्जूषा (mañjūṣā).

Vyakarana book cover
context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: archive.org: Catalogue of Pancaratra Agama Texts (vastu)

Mañjūṣā (मञ्जूषा) refers to a “vessel” (used for the garbhavinyāsa-ceremony), as discussed in chapter 6 (Kriyāpāda) of the Padmasaṃhitā: the most widely followed of Saṃhitā covering the entire range of concerns of Pāñcarātra doctrine and practice (i.e., the four-fold formulation of subject matter—jñāna, yoga, kriyā and caryā) consisting of roughly 9000 verses.—Description of the chapter [garbhavinyāsa-vidhi]:—This chapter tells what materials are deposited in a vessel [mañjūṣā] (1-9a, 23b-40), how that vessel is honored with a homa-rite (9b-16) and how the same vessel is ritually placed by the Ācārya, in the pit prepared (with “female” bricks—see preceding chapter) for its reception (17-23a). [...]

Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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India history and geography

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature (history)

Mañjūṣā (मञ्जूषा) is the name of a commentary (on Nāthanavaratnamālā of his own) on the topic of Mantraśāstra ascribed to Bhāskararāya (C. 1685-1775 C.E.), a polymath of who composed around forty works covering the subjects of vedānta, mīmāṃsā, vyākaraṇa, nyāya, prosody, kāvya, smṛti, mantraśāstra, Vedic literature. Also see the “New Catalogus Catalogorum” XVII. pp. 133-135.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Mañjūṣā.—(LL), casket. Note: mañjūṣā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Manjusha in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

mañjūsā : (f.) a casket; box.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Mañjūsā, (f.) (cp. Epic Sk. mañjūṣā) a casket; used for keeping important documents in J. II, 36 (suvaṇṇapaṭṭaṃ mañjūsāya nikkhipāpesi); IV, 335 (suvaṇṇapaṭṭaṃ sāra-mañjūsāyaṃ ṭhapetvā kālam akāsi). (Page 515)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mañjuṣā (मञ्जुषा) or Mañjūṣā (मञ्जूषा).—[mañj-ūṣan]

1) A box, casket, chest, receptacle; मदीयपद्यरत्नानां मञ्जूषैषा मया कृता (madīyapadyaratnānāṃ mañjūṣaiṣā mayā kṛtā) Bv.4.45; अपारकोषगर्भासु मञ्जूषासु निजैर्नरैः (apārakoṣagarbhāsu mañjūṣāsu nijairnaraiḥ) Śiva B.29.56.

2) A large basket, hamper; मञ्जुषाऽपि च मञ्जूषा पेटा च पेटिकेत्यपि (mañjuṣā'pi ca mañjūṣā peṭā ca peṭiketyapi) Śabdaratnāvalī.

3) Madder (= mañjiṣṭhā).

4) A stone.

See also (synonyms): mañjuṣikā.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mañjūṣā (मञ्जूषा).—f.

(-ṣā) 1. A basket, a large basket, 2. A stone. 3. Bengal madder. 4. The case in which the great bow that Rama broke, was kept. E. manj to make pure or clean by ablution, Unadi aff. ūṣan, and the nasal augment; also with a short vowel mañjuṣā .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mañjūṣā (मञ्जूषा).—f. 1. A basket, [Kathāsaritsāgara, (ed. Brockhaus.)] 4, 74. 2. A receptacle, [Rāmāyaṇa] 1, 67, 4.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mañjūṣā (मञ्जूषा).—(& mañjūṣikā) [feminine] box, basket.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Mañjūṣā (मञ्जूषा) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—See Nyāyamañjūṣā, Vedāntaratnamañjūṣā, Vaiyākaraṇasiddhāntamañjūṣā.

2) Mañjūṣā (मञ्जूषा):—a
—[commentary] on the Jāgadīśī, by Kṛṣṇabhaṭṭa Ārḍe.

Mañjūṣā has the following synonyms: Jagadīśatoṣaṇī.

3) Mañjūṣā (मञ्जूषा):—[nyāya] Rice. 116.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mañjūṣā (मञ्जूषा):—f. ([cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc., also] mañjuṣā) a box, chest, case, basket, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) receptacle of or for (often ifc., rarely [in the beginning of a compound] in titles of works; also Name of various works and sometimes abridged for the fuller names, e.g. for dhātu-nyāya-m etc.)

3) Rubia Munjista, [Bhāvaprakāśa]

4) a stone, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mañjūṣā (मञ्जूषा):—(ṣā) 1. f. A basket; a stone; madder; bow case of Rāma.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Mañjuṣā (मञ्जुषा) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Maṃjūsā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Manjusha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Manjusha in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Manjusha in Hindi refers in English to:—(nf) a casket, box, chest..—manjusha (मंजूषा) is alternatively transliterated as Maṃjūṣā.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Maṃjūsā (मंजूसा) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Mañjuṣā.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Maṃjūṣa (ಮಂಜೂಷ):—

1) [noun] a box, chest, case.

2) [noun] basket; a bushel; a crate.

3) [noun] a town; a city.

4) [noun] a detached, relatively small piece of a rock; a stone.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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