Manjira, Mañjīra: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Manjira means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Mañjīra (मञ्जीर) refers to “anklets”, according to the 13th-century Matsyendrasaṃhitā: a Kubjikā-Tripurā oriented Tantric Yoga text of the Ṣaḍanvayaśāmbhava tradition from South India.—Accordingly, “[Visualisation of Parameśvara]:—[...] He is adorned with nice anklets (cāru-mañjīra), armlets, rings and bracelets, and he shines with small toe rings, Channahīras, etc., and diadems and a crown. His face is gracious, beautiful, his lips are smeared with betel leaves. His mind is filled with the joy of wine, and his body is supreme bliss [itself]. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Mañjīra (मञ्जीर) refers to “anklets”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.46 (“The arrival of the bridegroom”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada: “[...] In the meantime the servant-maids in the harem of the mountain took Pārvatī out in order to worship the tutelar family deity. [...] She had a gem-set mirror in her hand. A toy lotus also embellished her. Sandal paste, aguru musk and saffron were smeared over the body by her. Her feet and soles were naturally red. Tinkling anklets (kvaṇat-mañjīra-pāda) added to their beauty. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Shodhganga: Elements of Art and Architecture in the Trtiyakhanda of the Visnudharmottarapurana (natya)

Manjira refers to a type of string instrument common to the region of Assam.—Indian classical Music is highly influenced by the Nāṭyaśāstra, the Saṃgītaratnākara etc. As the Viṣṇudharmottarapurāṇa follows the Nāṭyaśāstra in a great extent, this work also influences somehow the Indian classical Music. [...] Some indigenous instruments of Assam can also be classified under these four kinds of instruments as stated in the Viṣṇudharmottarapurāṇa. Instruments like mañjirā, bhortāl and khutitāl are three kinds of Tāla, and fall under the category of ghana i.e., solid kind of instrument.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (shastra) of performing arts, (natya—theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing Dramatic plays (nataka), construction and performance of Theater, and Poetic works (kavya).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Manjira in Pali glossary
Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Mañjīra, (cp. late Sk. mañjīra nt. ) an anklet, foot-bangle Abhp 228. (Page 515)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mañjīra (मञ्जीर).—[mañj-dhvanau īran] An anklet or ornament for the foot (nūpura); सिञ्जानमञ्जुमञ्जीरं प्रविवेश निकेतनम् (siñjānamañjumañjīraṃ praviveśa niketanam) Gīt 11; or मुखमधीरं त्यज मञ्जीरं रिपुमिव केलिषु लोलम् (mukhamadhīraṃ tyaja mañjīraṃ ripumiva keliṣu lolam) 5; Mālatīmādhava (Bombay) 1.

-ram A post round which the string of the churning stick passes.

Derivable forms: mañjīraḥ (मञ्जीरः), mañjīram (मञ्जीरम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mañjīra (मञ्जीर).—n.

(-raṃ) An ornament for the feet or toes. m.

(-raḥ) A post, round which passes the string that works the stick of a churn. E. manj to sound, aff. īran; also with kan added mañjīraka .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mañjīra (मञ्जीर).—I. m. and n. An ornament for the feet. Ii. m. A post round which passes the string that works the stick of a churn.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mañjīra (मञ्जीर).—[substantive] foot-ornament, anklet.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Mañjīra (मञ्जीर) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—poet. [Subhāshitāvali by Vallabhadeva]

2) Mañjīra (मञ्जीर):—jy. by Rāma. Oudh. V, 12.
—[commentary] by Rāmasevaka. Oudh. Xviii, 34.

3) Mañjīra (मञ्जीर):—jy. by Rāma. Oudh. Xxi, 84.

4) Mañjīra (मञ्जीर):—jy. by Rāma. Ulwar 1892. Extr. 539.
—[commentary] by Rāmasevaka. ibid.

5) Mañjīra (मञ्जीर):—jy. by Rāmasevaka. L.. 1069 ([fragmentary]). Hr. Notices Vol. Xi, Pref. p. 4.

Mañjīra has the following synonyms: Muhūrtabhūṣaṇa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mañjīra (मञ्जीर):—[from mañj] mn. (ifc. f(ā). ) a foot-ornament, anklet, [Kāvya literature; Purāṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] m. Name of a poet, [Catalogue(s)]

3) Mañjīrā (मञ्जीरा):—[from mañjīra > mañj] f. Name of a river, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Mañjīra (मञ्जीर):—[from mañj] n. a post round which the string of the churning-stick passes, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] a kind of metre, [Colebrooke]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mañjīra (मञ्जीर):—(raṃ) 1. n. An ornament for the feet or toes. m. A post to which the churning stick is tied.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Mañjīra (मञ्जीर) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Maṃjarī.

[Sanskrit to German]

Manjira in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Manjira in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Maṃjīra (मंजीर) [Also spelled manjir]:—(nm) cymbal(s).

2) Maṃjīrā (मंजीरा):—(nm) cymbal(s).

context information

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Maṃjira (ಮಂಜಿರ):—

1) [noun] (pros.) a kind of poetry.

2) [noun] (pros.) a kind of metre.

--- OR ---

Maṃjīra (ಮಂಜೀರ):—

1) [noun] an anklet; a foot-ornament.

2) [noun] a post round which the string of the churning-stick passes.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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Nepali dictionary

Source: unoes: Nepali-English Dictionary

Mañjīra (मञ्जीर):—n. → नूपुर [nūpura]

context information

Nepali is the primary language of the Nepalese people counting almost 20 million native speakers. The country of Nepal is situated in the Himalaya mountain range to the north of India.

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