Mandalin, Maṇḍalin: 12 definitions

Introduction:

Mandalin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Maṇḍalin (मण्डलिन्) refers to the “ecliptic” [?], according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 5), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “[...] Now, if [Rāhu] has a body or be simply a head with a regular motion in the ecliptic [i.e., maṇḍalin], how comes it that he eclipses the sun and moon when they are 180° from him? If his motion be not subject to fixed laws, how comes it that his exact place is ascertained; how comes it that he never eclipses by the part of his body between his head and tail? If being of the shape of a serpent he eclipses with his head or with his tail, how comes it that he does not hide one half of the heavens lying between his head and tail?”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

Discover the meaning of mandalin in the context of Jyotisha from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mandalin in Pali glossary
Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Maṇḍalin, (adj.) (fr. maṇḍala) 1. circular Th. 1, 863 (maṇḍali-pākāra).—2. having a disk, orbed (of the sun) S. I, 51=VvA. 116. (Page 517)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of mandalin in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Maṇḍalin (मण्डलिन्).—a. [maṇḍala-ini]

1) Forming a circle, made up into a coil; बाता मण्डलिनस्तीव्रा व्यपसव्यं प्रचक्रमुः (bātā maṇḍalinastīvrā vyapasavyaṃ pracakramuḥ) Rām.6. 17.21.

2) Ruling a country. -m.

1) A particular kind of snake.

2) A snake in general.

3) A cat.

4) The pole-cat.

5) A dog.

6) The sun.

7) The fig-tree.

8) The ruler of a province.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Maṇḍalin (मण्डलिन्).—adj., or subst. m., (1) usually with rājan [Page416-b+ 71] (= AMg. id., [Paia-sadda-mahaṇṇavo]; compare prec. and Sanskrit māṇḍalika; māṇḍa- lika-rājan Mahāvyutpatti 3674, so also Mironov, cited in [Boehtlingk and Roth] from Minayev as maṇḍalaka°), ruler of a (minor) region; as subst. king: mṛgamaṇḍalīva Mahāvastu ii.405.2 (verse) like a king of beasts (= a lion); maṇḍalino rājāno praṇata mahyaṃ Mahāvastu ii.40.9 (verse), said by Śuddhodana, referring to the time of the Bodhisattva's birth; especially in contrast with more powerful monarchs, rājānaś ca maṇḍalino balacakravartinaś (see this) caturdvīpakacakravartinaś (see this) ca Saddharmapuṇḍarīka 6.4 and 20.6 (prose); the same three in reverse order, rājñāṃ… cakravartināṃ balacakravartīn’ atha maṇḍalīnām Saddharmapuṇḍarīka 362.8 (verse); rājāno maṇḍalinas…(rājānaṃ cakravartinaṃ pratyuttiṣṭhanti) Lalitavistara 15.2; (2) m. or nt., in Divyāvadāna 359.19 (verse, printed as prose) seems to be used of a small body of water, in contrast with the ocean, as a mustard-seed with Mt. Meru, or a firefly with the sun: (kiṃ) sarṣapena (so!) samatāṃ nayasīha Meruṃ, khadyotakena raviṃ (read ravi, m.c.) maṇḍalinā samudram, why are you here making…the sea equal to a maṇḍalin? I cannot explain the word, which is not noted in Index or Notes to ed.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Maṇḍalin (मण्डलिन्).—mfn. (lī-linī-li) Being in a circle, made up into a coil or ball. 2. Surrounded by. m. (-lī) 1. A large species of snake. 2. A cat. 3. A Pole cat. 4. A dog. 5. The sun. 6. The ruler or governor of a Mandal or district. 7. The Indian fig-tree. E. maṇḍala a circle, and ini aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Maṇḍalin (मण्डलिन्).—i. e. maṇḍala + in, m. 1. A snake. 2. A cat.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Maṇḍalin (मण्डलिन्).—[adjective] forming a circle or ring; possessing or ruling a country.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Maṇḍalin (मण्डलिन्):—[from maṇḍala] mfn. forming a circle or ring, surrounding, enclosing (ifc.), [Kathāsaritsāgara]

2) [v.s. ...] (with vāta m.) a whirlwind, [Rāmāyaṇa]

3) [v.s. ...] marked with round spots (as a snake), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] possessing or ruling a country, [Lalita-vistara]

5) [v.s. ...] m. the ruler of a province (with Śaivas, a [particular] order or degree), [Sarvadarśana-saṃgraha]

6) [v.s. ...] the sun, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] a snake or a [particular] species of snake (cf. above), [Mahābhārata; Varāha-mihira; Suśruta]

8) [v.s. ...] a chameleon, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] a cat, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] a polecat, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] a dog, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] the Indian fig-tree, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Maṇḍalin (मण्डलिन्):—(lī) 5. m. A large species of snake; a cat, a pole-cat; a dog; the sun; ruler of a district. a. Coiled, made round.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Maṇḍalin (मण्डलिन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Maṃḍali.

[Sanskrit to German]

Mandalin in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of mandalin in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: