Manasikara, aka: Manasikāra; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Manasikara means something in Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

[Manasikara in Theravada glossaries]

N Fact to examine an object by means of the mind, in a penetrative manner. Appropriate consideration (of a situation), enabling the developement of healthy actions (kusalass).

(Source): Dhamma Dana: Pali English Glossary

One of the Sabbacittasadharana cetasikas. Manasikara is attention. It makes citta and other co arising cetasikas to attend at the object concerned. It acts like a steerer and it directs citta and other cetasikas to the right object. Manasikara always arises with each arising citta.

(Source): Journey to Nibbana: Patthana Dhama

attention;

Manasikara is One of the Seven Universals.

(Source): Dhamma Study: Cetasikas

s. manasikāra.

-- or --

'attention', 'mental advertence', 'reflection'.

1. As a psychological term, attention belongs to the formation-group (sankhāra-kkhandha; s. Tab. II) and is one of the 7 mental factors (cetasika) that are inseparably associated with all states of consciousness (s. cetanā). In M. 9, it is given as one of the factors representative of mind (nāma) It is the mind's first 'confrontation with an object' and 'binds the associated mental factors to the object.' It is, therefore, the prominent factor in two specific classes of consciousness: i.e. 'advertence (āvajjana, q.v.) at the five sense-doors' (Tab. I, 70) and at the mind-door (Tab. I, 71). These two states of consciousness, breaking through the subconscious life-continuum (bhavanga), form the first stage in the perceptual process (citta-vīthi; s. viññāna-kicca). See Vis.M. XIV, 152.

2. In a more general sense, the term appears frequently in the Suttas as yoniso-manasikāra, 'wise (or reasoned, methodical) attention' or 'wise reflection'. It is said, in M. 2, to counteract the cankers (āsava, q.v.); it is a condition for the arising of right view (s. M. 43), of Stream-entry (s. sotāpattiyanga), and of the factors of enlightenment (s. S. XLVI, 2.49,51). - 'Unwise attention' (ayoniso-manasikāra) leads to the arising of the cankers (s. M. 2) and of the five hindrances (s. S. XLVI, 2.51).

(Source): Pali Kanon: Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

Discover the meaning of manasikara in the context of Theravada from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Buddhism)

[Manasikara in Buddhism glossaries]

Manasikāra (Pāli), derived from manasi (locative of mana thus, loosely, "in mind" or "in thought") and karoti ("to make" or "to bring into") and has been translated as "attention" or "pondering" or "fixed thought".

(Source): WikiPedia: Buddhism

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[Manasikara in Pali glossaries]

manasikāra : (m.) ideation; consideration.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of manasikara in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

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