Mahishasuramardini, Mahiṣāsuramardinī, Mahishasura-mardini: 3 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Mahishasuramardini means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Mahiṣāsuramardinī can be transliterated into English as Mahisasuramardini or Mahishasuramardini, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

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In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

[«previous next»] — Mahishasuramardini in Shilpashastra glossary
Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)

Mahiṣāsuramardinī is the name of a deity depicted at the Nellaiappar Temple at Tirunelveli, representing a sacred place for the worship of Śiva.—Mahiṣāsuramardinī is represented with six pairs of hands. The right set of hands hold śūla (trident), khaḍga (sword), śakthāyuḍa (devi’s weapon), cakra (discus), a stringed bow, and gadā (mace) while the left hands hold pāśa, aṅkuśa, śaṅkh (shell), ghanṭa (bell), paraśu (axe) and shield. These pairs of hands are represented in kartarīmukha-hasta. While depiciting in dance, the hands are in kapittha-hasta and one pair of hands is in kartarīmukha-hasta.

Mahiṣāsuramardinī is also depicted at the Nellaiappar Temple at Tirunelveli, representing a sacred place for the worship of Śiva.—Mahiṣāsuramardinī is represented with six pairs of hands. The right set of hands hold śūla (trident), khaḍga (sword), śakthāyuḍa (devi’s weapon), cakra (discus), a stringed bow, and gadā (mace) while the left hands hold pāśa, aṅkuśa, śaṅkh (shell), ghanṭa (bell), paraśu (axe) and shield. These pairs of hands are represented in kartarīmukha-hasta. While depiciting in dance, the hands are in kapittha-hasta and one pair of hands is in kartarīmukha-hasta.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Mahishasuramardini in Shaktism glossary
Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (shaktism)

Mahiṣāsuramardinī (महिषासुरमर्दिनी) refers to one of the manifestations of Pārvatī or Śakti.—While seeing the Śakti avatāra images namely Durgā and Mahiṣāsuramardinī, who are vigorous and ferocious in their forms and character, the perceiver gets scared of the weapons held in their hands. The most scaring gestures are the tongue projecting outwards, the skull in one hand, the kapāla with blood in one hand and the wide opened eyes with full of anger. But regardless of all this the perceiver admires the force with which the goddess fights for her devotees against the enemies who harass them. While depicting her in dance, so many variations can be brought in. The goddess is said to possess ten pairs of hands and each hand holds different weapons. So in sañcāribhāvas (improvisation of a particular sentiment or a story in various ways), all these characteristics can be very well brought out.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mahishasuramardini in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahiṣāsuramardinī (महिषासुरमर्दिनी):—[=mahiṣāsura-mardinī] [from mahiṣāsura > mahiṣa > mah] f. = -ghātinī (dinī-stotra n. Name of a Stotra)

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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