Mahiruha, Mahīruha, Mahi-ruha: 12 definitions

Introduction:

Mahiruha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Addaiyan Journal of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences: Tantra Literature of Kerala- Special Reference to Mātṛsadbhāva

Mahīruha (महीरुह) or “teak” refers to of the trees used for making Bimbas or Pratimās, according to the Mātṛsadbhāva, one of the earliest Śākta Tantras from Kerala.—Mātṛsadbhāva is a Kerala Tantric ritual manual dealing with the worship of Goddess Bhadrakālī (also known as Rurujit) along with sapta-mātṛs or Seven mothers. [...] There are many descriptions about the flora and fauna in Mātṛssadbhāva. [...] In the fourth chapter the author discussed about different types of trees [e.g., mahīruha] can be used to make pratimā or bimba.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Agriculture (Krishi) and Vrikshayurveda (study of Plant life)

Source: Shodhganga: Drumavichitrikarnam—Plant mutagenesis in ancient India

Mahīruha (महीरुह) refers to “trees” which were commonly manipulated for producing flowers and fruits out-of-season (akāla), according to the Vṛkṣāyurveda by Sūrapāla (1000 CE): an encyclopedic work dealing with the study of trees and the principles of ancient Indian agriculture.—Accordingly: “Trees produce flowers and fruits out of season undoubtedly if the following procedure is followed: Dioscorea bulbifera, Cuminum cyminum seed and sugarcane juice should be kept for a month in a pot containing clarified butter prepared in the moonlight and when the mixture is well formed, roots of the trees should be smeared with it and the basin should be filled with mud. Then sugarcane juice should be profusely sprinkled and the trees (mahīruha) should be smoked with honey and kuṇapa”.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mahiruha in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

mahīruha : (m.) a tree.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Mahīruha refers to: tree (“growing out of the earth”) Mhvs 14, 18, 18, 19. (Page 527)

Note: mahīruha is a Pali compound consisting of the words mahī and ruha.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mahīruha (महीरुह).—a tree; अकुसुमान् दधतं न महीरुहः (akusumān dadhataṃ na mahīruhaḥ) Kirātārjunīya 5.1; Śiśupālavadha 2.49.

Derivable forms: mahīruhaḥ (महीरुहः).

Mahīruha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahī and ruha (रुह).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahīruha (महीरुह).—m.

(-haḥ) A tree. E. mahī the earth, and ruh to grow, aff. ka; also with kvip aff. mahīruh m. (-ruṭ .)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahīruha (महीरुह).—[masculine] = [preceding]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mahīruha (महीरुह):—[=mahī-ruha] [from mahī > mah] m. idem, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] Tectona Grandis, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] ([probably] [wrong reading] for -saha).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahīruha (महीरुह):—[mahī-ruha] (haḥ) 1. m. A tree.

[Sanskrit to German]

Mahiruha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Mahīruha (ಮಹೀರುಹ):—[noun] a plant in gen. (usu. referred to a tree in particular).

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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