Mahasiddha, Mahāsiddha, Maha-siddha: 7 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Mahasiddha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Mahasiddha in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Mahāsiddha (महासिद्ध) refers to “great Siddhas” (viz., engrossed in devotion), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.40.—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] after going beyond Alakā, the capital of the king of Yakṣas and the Saugandhika park, they saw the fig-tree of Śiva. [...] Beneath that vaṭa of yogic potentialities, Viṣṇu and other Devas saw Śiva seated. The vaṭa was the refuge of those seeking salvation. Śiva was being served and venerated by Brahmā’s sons, the great Siddhas (i.e., mahāsiddha) engrossed in devotion to Śiva joyously. They were calm. Their very physical body inspired calmness”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Mahasiddha in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Mahāsiddha (महासिद्ध) refers to a “great Siddha”, according to the second recension of the Yogakhaṇḍa of the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, as the Lord said to Bhadrakālī: “[...] Today, I am one who has done auspicious work. Today I am Śaṃkara and Śiva. I have seen a divine energy: Dakṣa’s daughter, in (her) youth. I have become distraught and mad by that second very powerful curse. Thus, today, I have seen you; (so, I have become) a great Siddha [i.e., mahāsiddha]. (I have) experienced you as (my) wife for seven births, age after age”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Mahāsiddha (महासिद्ध) refers to a group of deities summoned by the Yamāntaka-mantra and mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Mahāsiddha).

Source: Himalayan Art: Indian Adept Main Page (Mahasiddha)

Mahāsiddha (महासिद्ध):—great (mahā) accomplished one (siddha), or great spiritually accomplished one, also known as Indian adepts. They are the principal Indian teachers of Hindu and Buddhist Tantra, or any great religious teacher that is credited with having special attainments and powers.

The majority of mahāsiddhas do not have Siddha Appearance - which is one of the Eleven Figurative Forms in Himalayan and Tibetan art. The majority of the Eighty-four mahāsiddhas are depicted in layperson attire, a few monks, along with several kings and mendicant yogis.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mahasiddha in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahāsiddha (महासिद्ध):—[=mahā-siddha] [from mahā > mah] m. ‘very perfect’, a great saint, perfect Yogin, [Horace H. Wilson]

[Sanskrit to German]

Mahasiddha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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