Lokanatha, aka: Loka-natha, Lokanāthā, Lokanātha; 10 Definition(s)

Introduction

Lokanatha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Lokanatha in Pancaratra glossary... « previous · [L] · next »

Lokanātha (लोकनाथ) refers to one of the various Vibhava manifestations according to the Īśvarasaṃhitā 24.300-302.—Accordingly, “who has wide eyes is saluted by all gods, occupies a good throne and has the eyes closed in meditation. He is seated on a lotus (or in the padmāsana posture), is of a complexion comparable to the inferior of the lotus and has his intellect filled with sympathy. His hands bear the (marks of) conch and lotus. He proclaims (shows) the three courses of knowledge, detachment and good dharma

These Vibhavas (eg., Lokanātha) represent the third of the five-fold manifestation of the Supreme Consciousness the Pāñcarātrins believe in.

Source: archive.org: Isvara Samhita Vol 1
Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

Discover the meaning of lokanatha in the context of Pancaratra from relevant books on Exotic India

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Lokanatha in Theravada glossary... « previous · [L] · next »

One of the five daughters of Vijayabahu I. and Tilokasundari. She married Kittisirimegha. Cv.lix.31, 44.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

Discover the meaning of lokanatha in the context of Theravada from relevant books on Exotic India

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Lokanatha in Mahayana glossary... « previous · [L] · next »

Lokanātha (लोकनाथ) is a synonym for the Buddha according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter IV). Lou kia na t’a (Lokanātha) in the language of Ts’in means “protector of the world”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

Discover the meaning of lokanatha in the context of Mahayana from relevant books on Exotic India

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Lokanātha (लोकनाथ) is the name of a Vīra (hero) who, together with the Ḍākinī named Lokanāthī forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Hṛdayacakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the hṛdayacakra refers to one of the four divisions of the sahaja-puṭa (‘innate layer’), situated within the padma (lotus) in the middle of the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs and Vīras [viz., Lokanātha] are reddish yellow in color; they each have one face and four arms. they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala
Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

Discover the meaning of lokanatha in the context of Tibetan Buddhism from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Lokanatha in Pali glossary... « previous · [L] · next »

lokanātha : (m.) the lord of the world.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of lokanatha in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Marathi-English dictionary

Lokanatha in Marathi glossary... « previous · [L] · next »

lōkanātha (लोकनाथ).—m (S) A particular medicinal preparation. 2 (Lord of the people.) A term for God or for a king.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of lokanatha in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Lokanatha in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [L] · next »

Lokanātha (लोकनाथ).—

1) Brahman.

2) Viṣṇu.

3) Śiva.

4) a king, sovereign.

5) a Buddha

6) the sun.

Derivable forms: lokanāthaḥ (लोकनाथः).

Lokanātha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms loka and nātha (नाथ).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Lokanātha (लोकनाथ).—frequent as ep. of the historic Buddha, as in Pali, e.g. LV 97.16; in Sādh (29.17 etc.) n. or ep. of a Buddha; it is not clear that Śākyamuni is meant, tho he may be.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Lokanātha (लोकनाथ).—m.

(-thaḥ) 1. A sovereign of the universe. 2. One of the Jaina or Bauddh'ha saints. E. loka the world, nātha lord.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of lokanatha in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 869 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Loka
Loka (लोक).—m. (-kaḥ) 1. Man, mankind. 2. A world, a division of the universe; in general three...
Lokapala
Lokapāla (लोकपाल).—m. (-laḥ) 1. A king, a sovereign. 2. A divinity who protects the regions, or...
Natha
Nātha (नाथ).—m. (-thaḥ) 1. A master, a lord. 2. A name of Siva, especially in the form of a Lin...
Brahmaloka
Brahmaloka (ब्रह्मलोक) refers to fourteen Brahmā worlds, as defined in the Śivapurāṇa 1.17. Acc...
Lokuttara
Lokottara (लोकोत्तर).—adj. (compare Sanskrit id., Pali lokuttara; compare lokika, laukika), sup...
Madhyaloka
Madhyaloka (मध्यलोक).—m. (-kaḥ) The earth, the dwelling of mortals. E. madhya middle, and loka ...
Vaidyanatha
Vaidyanātha (वैद्यनाथ) or Nāganātha refers to one of twelve Jyotirliṅgas, according to the...
Devaloka
Devaloka refers to: the particular sphere of any devas, the seat of the devas, heaven; there e...
Janaloka
Janaloka (जनलोक).—m. (-kaḥ) One of the seven Lokas or divisions of the world, the fifth, next a...
Pitriloka
Pitṛloka (पितृलोक).—m. (-kaḥ) The world or sphere of the manes: it is variously situated, but p...
Vishvanatha
Viśvanātha (विश्वनाथ).—m. (-thaḥ) A name of Siva, especially as the object of peculiar adoratio...
Manushyaloka
Manuṣyaloka (मनुष्यलोक).—the world of mortals, the earth. Derivable forms: manuṣyalokaḥ (मनुष्य...
Nagaloka
Nāgaloka (नागलोक).—m. (-kaḥ) The Naga regions below the earth. E. nāga a Naga, and loka world.
Gananatha
Gaṇanātha (गणनाथ) is an epithet of both Śiva and Gaṇeśa, as mentioned in the Śivapurāṇa-māhātmy...
Vishnuloka
Viṣṇuloka (विष्णुलोक) refers to fourteen Viṣṇu worlds, as defined in the Śivapurāṇa 1.17. Accor...

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: